Category: struggle against racism
The USA, European Union and Ukraine denied to condemn Nazism at the UN General Assembly

Sunday, November 19, 2017

The USA, European Union and Ukraine denied to condemn Nazism at the UN General Assembly

https://communismgr.blogspot.com/2017/11/the-usa-european-union-and-ukraine.html
Hiding behind the pretext of “freedom of speech”, the United States– accompanied by Ukrainevoted against a resolution condemning the glorification of Nazism introduced to the Third Committee of the U.N. General Assembly by the Russian Federation. 
 
The resolution was approved by a recorded vote of 125 in favor to 2 against, with 51 abstentions. 
 
Among the abstentions are the countries of the European Union (including Greece), Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Turkey and Libya. 
Following the draft’s introduction, the United States representative proposed an amendment to the text that would change all sections deemed to violate- according to the US- individual freedoms of speech, thought, expression and association. The amendment was rejected by a recorded vote of 81 against, to 3 in favour (Israel, Ukraine, United States), with 73 abstentions.
Speaking after the draft, as a whole, was approved by a vote of 125 in favour to 2 against (Ukraine, United States), with 51 abstentions, several States commended efforts to combat Nazism, yet expressed concern over the scope of the draft.  
 
Showing the EU’s hypocrisy, Estonia’s delegate, on behalf of the European Union, said all contemporary forms of racism should be addressed in an impartial manner! We must remember that the government of Estonia- like other Baltic countries- have a leading role in glorifying Nazism during the last years, by honoring the Waffen-SS, organizing anticommunist fiestas and distorting history under the auspices of the European Union. 
 
No matter how hard they try to distort history, to glorify Nazism-Fascism and vilify Socialism-Communism, the historical truth is one and only: The Soviet Red Army and the peoples’ antifascist resistance crushed Nazism in WW2.
 
Black men get longer prison sentences than white men for the same crime: report

Black men get longer prison sentences than white men for the same crime: report

Inmates put their hands behind their backs as they return to their dormitory from the cafeteria Sept. 21, 2011, at Richland Parish Detention Center southeast of Monroe.
Inmates put their hands behind their backs as they return to their dormitory from the cafeteria Sept. 21, 2011, at Richland Parish Detention Center southeast of Monroe.(File photo by Scott Threlkeld)

http://www.nola.com/crime/index.ssf/2017/11/black_men_get_longer_prison_se.html

African-American men in the criminal justice system serve longer sentences than white men who commit the same crime, according to a new federal study reported by ABC News Friday (Nov. 17).

After a review of demographic data of the country’s prisons from 2012 to 2016, the U.S. Sentencing Commission found that sentences for black men are 19.1 percent longer than for white men. When the commission accounted for violence in an offender’s past, black men last year also received sentences that were 20.4 percent longer than their white peers.

“After controlling for a wide variety of sentencing factors, the Commission found that Black male offenders continued to receive longer sentences than similarly situated White male offenders, and that female offenders of all races received shorter sentences than White male offenders,” the report stated.

The full ABC News report can be read online.

As AfD joins Bundestag, thousands protest racism in Berlin

http://p.dw.com/p/2mJrV

 

As AfD joins Bundestag, thousands protest racism in Berlin

Two days before the new Bundestag convenes, protesters called on the German government not to tolerate right-wing hatred. The message was clearly directed at the far-right Alternative for Germany party.

 Permalink http://p.dw.com/p/2mK4H

Thousands gather in Berlin to condemn racism

On Tuesday, a far-right party will enter Germany’s parliament for the first time in nearly six decades. In an attempt to set the tone before the Alternative for Germany party (AfD) takes its seats in the Bundestag, at least 10,000 demonstrators turned out in front of Berlin’s Brandenburg Gate on Sunday, holding signs reading “My Heart Beats for Diversity,” “No AfD” and — playing on calls to cap the numbers of refugees allowed into the country — “Upper Limits on Nazis.”

The official title of the event, “Against Racism and Hate in the Bundestag,” didn’t explicitly mention the far-right party, which took 12.6 percent of the vote in national elections on September 24. But initiator Ali Can made clear who the intended recipient of the demonstration’s message was when he addressed the crowd.

“I’ve read the constitution and am somewhat shocked at some of the things politicians, especially the AfD, come out with,” Can said. “Have they even read Article 3? It explicitly states that no one shall be discriminated against or treated favorably because of where he comes from.”

The AfD swept into the Bundestag on a platform focused on hostility to refugees, the assertion that Germany is being “Islamified”, and the idea that migrants are a threat to law and order.

Can called for greater mutual respect in society and for politicians to lead the way, arguing that tolerance is in everyone’s interest.

“Even AfD politicians can be the victims of prejudice,” Can told DW. “We’re coming out here against racism and hatred in general, no matter where it comes from and at whom it’s directed.”

Can knows of what he speaks. The 23-year-old himself was once a refugee.

‘Clear, rigorous opposition’

Can, whose Turkish-Kurdish family fled southeastern Turkey for Germany when he was only 2 years old, is somewhat unusual among multicultural activists. For one, he seeks dialogue with the people he opposes.

Last year, for example, Can set up a “hotline for concerned citizens” who claimed to be worried about the negative effects that they believed migrants had had on Germany. Presenting himself as a “migrant you can trust,” Can posted his phone number on the internet — an act of considerable courage during an age in which hate speech and trolling have become so common — and encouraged AfD voters and supporters of the anti-immigration PEGIDA movement to call him with their questions.

Can is an unapologetic idealist who knows how to mobilize people and attract publicity to his cause. Sunday’s demonstration was organized at a furious pace after the election and was supported by more than a dozen prominent activist groups.

The turnout won’t likely do anything to change the minds of the Bundestag’s AfD deputies. Those with more political experience than Can point out that more than noble sentiments will be needed to impose limits on the AfD’s legislators.

“If you look at the list of the parliamentarians who will be joining the Bundestag, there are unfortunately a whole series of them who’ve attracted attention in the past with right-wing extremist or racist statements,” Anton Hofreiter, the joint parliamentary leader of the Greens, told DW. “It’s important to combat them with clear, rigorous opposition.”

Demonstration against AfD in Bundestag The protesters are anxious as the far-right party prepares to enter the Bundestag

The anti-AfD majority

Political realism did not deter Hofreiter from joining the ranks of the demonstrators who marched from the Brandenburg Gate to the Victory Column and the Reichstag, and then back to the Brandenburg Gate for a concert featuring the Berlin hip-hop and reggae band Culcha Candela.

“What we want to do today is to send a signal,” singer Johnny Strange told DW. “Some 13 percent of voters chose the AfD in the election, but there’s a large majority (who didn’t), and I think they should be seen and heard.”

he crowd that showed up on Sunday was an example of the diversity of German society. Some of the protesters had immigration backgrounds; others came out of a sense of duty stemming from the country’s Nazi past.

“I was born in Korea, but I grew up in Germany and have lived here for 40 years,” one woman said. “I want to say: ‘This is my land.’ I think in a democracy you have to fight for that.”

“I think as a German you have a responsibility to ensure that parties like the AfD never again have the final say in German politics,” a man said.

When pressed on what concrete measures they wanted German politicians to take, many of the protesters were at something of a loss. But they were clear that they do not want the Bundestag to become a forum for racist and xenophobic sentiments. And that was reason enough to take to the streets on a fine late-autumn day to vent their unease with the AfD.

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