Category: Discrimination against communists
KKE: Protest outside the Polish embassy in Athens against anticommunist persecutions

Tuesday, November 28, 2017

KKE: Protest outside the Polish embassy in Athens against anticommunist persecutions

https://communismgr.blogspot.com/2017/11/kke-protest-outside-polish-embassy-in.html
With a protest outside the Polish embassy yesterday in Athens, members of the Communist Party of Greece expressed their condemnation of the anticommunist persecutions that take place in Poland.
The delegation of the KKE, headed by the Member of the European Parliament Kostas Papadakis, delivered to the personnel of the embassy a statement in which the Party expresses its opposition to the persecutions.
It must be reminded that the court proceedings were due to start on Monday 27/11, with the judicial prosecution based on charges of propagating communist ideology in the „Brzask” newspaper and on the Communist Party of Poland’s website.
In its statement the KKE “condemns and denounces these anticommunist measures and persecutions, every kind of prohibitions against communists such as trials against them, prohibitions of communist symbols and of spreading communist ideas. This unacceptable persecution under no circumstances is lawful because it has the support of the reactionary EU or because similar (persecutions) are promoted in other countries”.
“The prohibitions”, writes the KKE statement, “the repression measures against the activity of the communists go hand-by-hand with the overall antiworkers measures and the attack to the rights and conquests of the working class”.
“They consist part of the known propaganda about “totalitarian regime” that promotes the provocative and unhistorical equation of communism with the monster of fascism, which is born and raised by the capitalist system”.
The KKE expresses its solidarity to the communists and the class-labour movement of Poland and demands the immediate withdrawal of all persecutions against the CP of Poland, its members and cadres.
Source: 902.gr / Translation: In Defense of Communism.
Gentle Giant

https://www.sacurrent.com/sanantonio/gentle-giant/Content?oid=2268857

GENTLE GIANT

At 79, he has outlived his most outspoken critics and several spans of public scorn. Most of those who know his name today are activists or labor liberals — and they have only praise for him, despite his long and entirely public or “open” membership in the Communist Party, USA.

“He’s a true organizer, of a dying breed,” says Graciela Sanchez, director of the Esperanza Peace & Justice Center.

Those who have dealt with Stanford over the years say that rather than pose as a militant, he speaks in the voice of consensus and prudence.

 Tom Flower, a Vietnam-era protester, now an Anglican minister better known for work among the homeless, argues that, “actually, John is pretty conservative about doing things that might upset people. He doesn’t like to put leaflets on people’s windshields, for example.”

But Stanford wasn’t always viewed as the mild character that he seems to be today. There was a time when he was seen as a threat to the free world.

In 1950, he entered the peace movement by circulating the Stockholm Peace Petition, which called for banning nuclear weapons, and was roundly viewed as a conspirator in a global plot to further Stalin’s aims.

Stanford says that the joined the Party on the day after his discharge from the U.S. Navy in 1946. He became an activist within weeks, soon after re-enrolling at the University of Texas at Austin. Late that year, the Houston Informer reported that Stanford gave a speech in the basement of a Baptist church, under the sponsorship of the youth wing of the NAACP.

“White students are learning that it is time for them to fight for the rights of the Negro people,” he declared, characteristically throwing in a bit of wishful thinking. “If we increase our unity, we can make of the South a place where everyone can have a decent living, health, and education facilities.”

Stanford, who is white, delivered his Houston speech to support a lawsuit by Heman Sweatt, a black postal worker, to gain admission to the University of Texas law school. It was not the kind of speech that ordinary white men gave in that era of poll taxes and statutory segregation.

“In the South in the 1930s and 1940s, there were very, very few whites who spoke out for racial equality,” explains Maurice Isserman, the nation’s leading scholar on American communist affairs. “To do so was to put your life at risk.

And in many instances, the white Southerners who were willing to take that risk were in, or close to, the Communist Party.”

Sweatt’s legal challenge, won in 1950, is today seen as a precedent to the more-famous 1954 ruling in Brown vs. Board of Education, which ordered the integration of all public schools.

Because of his victory, Sweatt posthumously became a Texas hero, his portrait displayed at the Institute of Texan Cultures, a scholarship and college campus named in his honor.

feat-stanford-0944_330jpg
John Stanford was one of the few whites who spoke out for racial equality in the 1930s and 1940s. Photos by Mark Greenberg

The Meerschaum pipe Members of the Communist Party customarily don’t reveal the names of members or former members who are still alive. But Sweatt’s death has freed Stanford to declare that at the time of the suit, Sweatt, too, was a Communist Party member. Unlike Sweatt, Stanford was never closeted, even if it was because he had little choice, thanks to the Texas Legislature and the Houston police. He moved to the Bayou City following his graduation from UT, and on September 16, 1948 — El Diez y Seis de Septiembre, Mexican Independence Day — the bilingual agitator was arrested for distributing Party leaflets decrying “the ruthless economic, political, and social oppression of the Mexican-American people.”

In 1951, Texas passed a Communist Control Act that required Party members to register with authorities, and prescribed a two- to 10-year prison term for failure to comply with the law. The Party decided to challenge the law’s dubious constitutionality, and Stanford, who was by then living in San Antonio, volunteered to be the test case, mailing an open letter to officials in 1952, declaring his membership. According to the plan, he was to refuse to register when the authorities responded.

But the 1950s were tough times for even the Party’s bravest members. Eleven national leaders of the group had been indicted under federal anti-communist laws, and some of them were already behind bars. After Stanford mailed his statement, the Party’s leadership found that it didn’t have the resources to pursue the Texas challenge, and ordered him to go underground.

“The Party had made a big mistake,” Stanford observes today. “It thought that fascism was coming.” He doesn’t remember everything that happened afterwards, partly because aging takes a toll, and partly, he says, because he tried to forget.

“I used to keep photo albums,” he recalls, “but when I went underground, I cut the faces out of the pictures, so that the FBI wouldn’t harass my friends. But the thing is, then I forgot, too, and can’t match names with faces now.”

To avoid arrest, he fled to Alabama, and knowing no one, found a job as a waiter at a diner and tried to lay low. But he couldn’t; it wasn’t in him to sit on the sidelines. After a few weeks in Birmingham, Stanford began attending meetings of a committee that was opposing fare hikes on city buses. Alabama bus fare activists, however, were wary of the Texan who showed up as if from nowhere; they thought that he was an FBI agent.

Stanford’s arrangement with the Party — like a scene from a movie about the French Resistance — was that he was to stay out of view for six months, then place a classified ad in the leading daily newspaper, saying that he had lost a meerschaum pipe. The person who called to report the discovery of the meerschaum, the plan went, would become his contact with the Party.

Stanford placed the ad and a young woman called. He asked her to meet him at the diner on a Sunday morning, when business was slow. Joanna Tylee walked in, she recalls, and upon seeing the Texan whom she remembered from the bus fare meetings, thought that she had walked into a trap.

The pipe plot had a happy ending: Joanna Tylee is today Jo Stanford. Following their marriage, John returned to San Antonio, and with her, reorganized the city’s frightened Communists and raised two children in the Jefferson neighborhood.

A Rosewood raid Back in Texas, prosecutors hadn’t forgotten Stanford. Through informers, they and the FBI kept eyes on the quiet-spoken protester, and as late as September 1963, San Antonio Express and News headlines assured its readers that “D.A. Still Studying Stanford.”

Officials had plenty of authority under which to act against him: Augmented by new measures, Texas laws by then prescribed 30-year prison terms for unregistered Reds. But the feds asked that Texas officials wait to nab Stanford until he could be designated as a Communist by the federal Subversive Activities Control Board, which delivered its finding on December 26, 1963.

Hours later, search warrant in hand, seven men from the district and state attorneys offices knocked on the door of the Stanford home, which was then on Rosewood Street, in the Beacon Hill area. John Stanford wasn’t home; Jo admitted the raiders and promptly telephoned the press. Meanwhile, her visitors began boxing some 2,000 books and various papers, including the couple’s marriage license, insurance policies, and mortgage schedule. The raid lasted for five hours. When reporters arrived, according to the Express and News, Jo welcomed them with, “Come on in and join the party!” But then she caught herself. “Or should I use another word?” she joked. The searchers claimed that the raid was necessary to prove that Stanford was imperiling public safety by selling Communist books and tracts through a mail-order bookstore in his home called All Points of View, which he had been operating since 1961.

In the months that followed, Stanford and his attorney, the late Maury Maverick Jr., were frequent subjects of the local press, whose handling of the affair betrayed an acquired admiration for the suspect. Reporters described Stanford as “affable,” and “pipe-smoking,” a designation that, in days before bongs, connoted “reflective” and “calm.”

Litigation over the book seizure wound up before the U.S. Supreme Court, where Maverick pointed out that among the confiscated items were copies of legal opinions on anti-communist laws penned by Justice Hugo Black.

“The reference to Justice Black’s opinion brought chuckles from the bench and several humorous exchanges that brightened the hushed dignity of the marble courtroom,” Express writer Ned Curran reported from Washington when the Court heard the case.

To almost no one’s surprise, the Court ruled the raid on Rosewood invalid, and the DA’s men, driving a borrowed red-and-white pickup, returned Stanford’s books to Rosewood.

They probably didn’t intend to aid or encourage the unarmed Stanford to overthrow the government, but the lawmen also gave him a gun, a .38-caliber pistol that had been taken for evidence in an unrelated case. Stanford, who has always claimed that he is for “socialism by peaceful and democratic means,” promptly returned the weapon.

Lingering suspicions Stanford’s victory before the Supreme Court kept him under public glare even after the ruling was old news. In 1965, an Express reporter grilled Stanford, who attended a demonstration to protest the killing of Reverend James Reeb during the Selma-to-Montgomery march led by Martin Luther King Jr.

Perhaps hoping to tarnish the voting rights movement, the reporter asked Stanford to justify his presence at the event. “I participated for the reason tens of thousands participated across the country — as a protest against the brutality being practiced against the Alabama Negroes,” Stanford shot back.

Six months later, his activities were again assailed in the local press when he sent anti-war leaflets to a mailing list that he had compiled, drawing a complaint from a soldier’s mother — not in San Antonio, but in distant El Paso.

“I believe the wars in Vietnam and the Dominican Republic endanger the lives of all American servicemen — including this woman’s son,” he told an inquisitor from the Express.

In the years since Vietnam, Stanford has taken part in dozens of other causes: the unionization of Valley farm workers, the campaign to Free Angela Davis, protests over U.S. involvement in Central America, and since 2001, Thursday peace vigils at the San Fernando Cathedral.

At protests against the U.S. occupation of Iraq, he is saying much the same thing today that he has said since 1946. “Capitalism doesn’t have a future,” he maintains. He insists that Soviet interests were only a marginal concern of his. “We weren’t concerned about Stalin’s policies during the 1950s, we were fighting against the poll tax,” he says.

Young demonstrators may dismiss Stanford as too old, and his trademark causes too dated to be relevant now, but they don’t suspect him, as their forerunners did, of joining their protests with a hidden agenda in mind. The ironies of history are endless, and one of them is that it’s not because he has spent more than 50 years on the barricades, but because there is no longer a Soviet state, that nobody questions Stanford’s sincerity today.

Solidarity with the Communist Party of Poland (KPP) – Condemn the anticommunist persecutions

Friday, November 24, 2017

Solidarity with the Communist Party of Poland (KPP) – Condemn the anticommunist persecutions

https://communismgr.blogspot.com/2017/11/solidarity-with-communist-party-of.html
Anti-communist persecution against the Communist Party of Poland continues. On 27th of November the court proceedings will restart. The judicial prosecution based on charges of propagating communist ideology in the „Brzask” newspaper and on the party’s website continues for two years.
This trial is a part of a campaign made by the government to illegalize the Communist Party of Poland.
This persecution is taking place simultaneously with the anti-communist policy of rewriting history and removing monuments and names of the streets associated with communism and workers’ movement from the public space.
We call for organising solidarity protests against the political persecution in front of Polish embassies all over the world on 27th of November.
Anti-communist represions in Poland were condemned by 67 parties that participated in the 19th International Meeting of Communist and Workers Parties. The common statement is the following:
We denounce the persecutions against our Polish comrades. These persecutions, as well as the persecutions in other EU member-states, go hand in hand with the intensification of the anti-popular offensive, aim at equating Communism with the fascist monster; they aim at erasing the achievements of Socialism from the collective memory of the peoples.
100 years after the October Revolution, the peoples can and must draw conclusions from the anti-communist political positions of the EU and of the bourgeois governments that are becoming more intense. They must trust the Communists and demand the satisfaction of their modern needs, organizing their struggle against the capitalist system, the monopolies and their power. All charges against the CP of Poland and its cadres have to be dropped immediately. Hands off the Communists of Poland, the Communist ideology and their unrestricted action. Solidarity with the CP of Poland!  Anti-communism shall notasdfsadfasdfass!”
CP of Poland emphasized that the following trial would be a part of a campaign by the government to illegalize the Communist Party. It said, “This persecution is taking place simultaneously with the anti-communist policy of rewriting history and removing monuments and names of the streets associated with communism and workers’ movement from the public space.”
The CP of Poland called for organising solidarity protests against the political persecution in front of Polish embassies all over the world on the trial day, November 27th.
The motion against the persecutions was signed by the following parties:
Communist Party of Australia
Party of Labour of Austria
Communist Party of Azerbaidjan
Progressive Tribune Bahrain
Communist Party of Bangladesh
Communist Party of Belarus
Communist Party of Brazil
Brazilian Communist Party
New Communist Party of Britain
Communist Party of Bulgaria
Party of the Bulgarian Communists
Socialist Workers Party of Croatia
Communist Party of Cuba
AKEL, Cyprus
Communist Party of Bohemia and Moravia
Egyptian Communist Party
Communist Party of Equador
Communist Party of Estonia
Unified Communist Party of Georgia
German Communist Party
Communist Party of Greece
Hungarian Workers’ Party
Communist Party of India
Communist Party of India (Marksist)
Iraqi Communist Party
Communist Party of Kurdistan
Tudeh Prty of Iran
Communist Party of Ireland
Workers Party of Ireland
Communist Party of Israel
Communist Party (Italy)
Jordanian Communist Party
Socialist Movement of Kazakhstan
Party of the Communists of Kyrgyzstan
Workers Party of Korea
Socialist Party of Latvia
Socialist Peoples’ Front (Lithuania)
Party of the Congress for the Independence of Madagascar
Communist Party of Mexico
Party of the Communists of Republic of Moldova
Communist Party of Nepal
Communist Party of Norway
Palestinian Communist Party
Paraguayan Communist Party
Communist Party of Peru (Patria Roja)
Peruan Communist Party
Philippine Communist Party (PKP-1930)
Portuguese Communist Party
Romanian Socialist Party
Communist Party of the Russian Federation
Russian Communist Workers Party
New Communist Party of Yugoslavia
Communists of Serbia
Communist Party of the People of Spain
Communits of Catalonia
Communist Party of Sri-Lanka
South African Communist Party
Sudanese Communist Party
Communist Party of Sweden
Syrian Communist Party
Syrian Communist Party (Unified)
Communist Party of Tadjikistan
Communist Party of Turkey
Communist Party of Ukraine
Union of Communists of Ukraine
Communist Party of Uruguay
Communist Party of Venezuela
KKE MEP Papadakis gives decisive response to EU Parliament’s vulgar anticommunism

Thursday, November 16, 2017

KKE MEP Papadakis gives decisive response to EU Parliament’s vulgar anticommunism

https://communismgr.blogspot.com/2017/11/kke-mep-papadakis-gives-decisive.html
KKE MEP Kostas Papadakis (standing).
A decisive answer to the vulgar anticommunism of the capital’s political represnetatives at the EU Parliament was given by the MEP of the Communist Party of Greece Kostas Papadakis. Speaking at the Plenary of the European Parliament on Wednesday in Strasbourg, the KKE MEP said the following:
 
“We defend Socialism, which within a few years solved big problems that remain unsolved in Capitalism. Socialism abolished unemployment and exploitation. Socialism showed to the people what permanent stable labor with rights, free Health – Education for everyone, low cost housing, certainty for the future mean.
 
The exploitative system that you are defending means labour galleon, queues of unemployed people, permanent insecurity, auctions, people searching in the garbage.
 
In Socialism, the people lived peacefully for decades. Your system is dripping blood from the crimes of the imperialist wars, with Hiroshimas, dismembered states, refugees.
 
Socialism defeated the monster of fascism in the Second World War and fascism is capitalism’s child. The democracy that you are promoting is the dictatorship of the monopolies.
 
The mud, the anticommunism, the prohibitions invoked by the supporters and apologists of Capitalism show their fear. The learned people will find again their way. Your rotten system is the past. 
 
The future of the world is Socialism-Communism.”
 
Source: 902.gr / Translation: In Defense of Communism.
From Warsaw with hate: Fascist and neo-Nazi groups marched in the streets of Poland’s capital

Monday, November 13, 2017

From Warsaw with hate: Fascist and neo-Nazi groups marched in the streets of Poland’s capital

https://communismgr.blogspot.com/2017/11/from-warsaw-with-hate-fascist-and-neo_13.html
Poland is the country where Communists are being persecuted for their activity and ideology by the bourgeois state’s mechanisms, the Communist Party faces every kind of repression by the government (which demolishes Soviet monuments) and where fascists, racists and neo-Nazis march in the streets, spreading their poison of hate! This is capitalism and EU’s Poland.
 
According to news agencies, an estimated ten thousand far-right nationalists marched in Poland’s capital city of Warsaw on Saturday, dwarfing the official celebrations and casting a pall on the country’s Independence Day commemoration.
The far-right… ‘We Want God’ march, while just one of several public events marking Poland’s independence in 1918, was by far the largest and loudest, with participants traveling from around the world to march in solidarity with anti-immigrant, racist and, in many cases, fascist causes.
 
Prior to the nationalist march, Polish President Andrzej Duda and European Union President Donald Tusk — a former Polish prime minister himself — attended a much smaller formal state ceremony.
 
The presence of the far-right in Warsaw was said to be the largest in recent memory, eclipsing the official state commemorative events, according to Abcnews.com. The annual march, initiated in 2009, appears to be the most popular global celebration of racism, and has consistently grown in size each year, cited by the New York Times.
 
Many white supremacist marchers waved xenophobic banners encouraging a growing racial divide in Europe that follows the massive influx of north African refugees fleeing several US-led ‘color revolutions,’ notably those in Tunisia, Libya and Egypt, as well as an enormous and ongoing human rights crisis in Syria.
 
Calling for a ‘White Europe of brotherly nations,’ marchers chanted racist slogans, including anti-Semitic calls to “remove Jewry from power,” cited by the Daily Mail.
 
Occurring at dusk and continuing into the later hours, marchers carried Christian symbols and red torches that ominously lit up the city, while red flares and firecrackers created a warlike urban scene.
 
 
Banners displaying the far-right 1930s falanga symbol were held aloft by many marchers, as well as a diverse array of posters, including those claiming that all Muslim immigrants are terrorists; same-sex marriage denouncements; and in support of the anti-Semitic National Radical Camp, a pre World War II group historically espousing extreme nationalist sentiments.
 
According to Russia Today, about 6,000 policemen were deployed to keep public order throughout the city. Warsaw seen a number of marches and events, such as a counter-protest organized by the anti-fascist movement. Around 1,500 people attended that rally which comprised members from a dozen or so left-wing organizations.
 
Holding banners with the wordings: “For your freedom and ours,” “Women against fascism,” “Nationalism is a disease,”and “Class struggle, not national,” activists were on the streets to counter nationalism, racism, sexism and other kinds of hatred.
 
Declassified documents expose US role in the 1965-66 massacre of millions of communists in Indonesia

Monday, October 30, 2017

Declassified documents expose US role in the 1965-66 massacre of millions of communists in Indonesia

https://communismgr.blogspot.com/2017/10/declassified-documents-expose-us-role.html
Declassified files have exposed just how much the US knew about and supported the massacre of millions of Indonesians in the 1965 anti-communist purges.
The non-governmental National Security Archive research group published 39 documents on Tuesday, out of thousands of pages of newly declassified files from the US embassy in Jakarta. They cover the period from 1963-66, documenting official knowledge and approval of the army’s death-squad operations to wipe out the three million-strong Communist Party of Indonesia (PKI) and its supporters.
Up to three million people were rounded up across the country, executed and dumped in mass graves. The files show that the US provided the Indonesian army with lists of senior communist party officials, equipment and money during the massacres. The purges led to the overthrow of communist-backed nationalist president Sukarno and the 31-year dictatorship of General Suharto.
The documents show US officials had credible evidence that contradicting the army’s claim about a supposed September 30 1965 bid by junior officers was ordered by the PKI — used as justification for the massacres.
A December 21 1965 diplomatic cable from the embassy’s first secretary Mary Vance Trent to Washington noted the “fantastic switch which has occurred over 10 short weeks.” Ms Trent estimated 100,000 had been slaughtered by then. A previously released April 1966 embassy cable said: “We frankly do not know whether the real figure is closer to 100,000 or 1,000,000” — and even the Indonesian government had only a “vague idea.”
A report covering November 1965 by embassy political affairs officer Edward Masters addressed the “problem” of holding and feeding suspected PKI prisoners. “Many provinces appear to be successfully meeting this problem by executing their PKI prisoners, or killing them before they are captured, a task in which Moslem [sic] youth groups are providing assistance,” he wrote.
A month later the US consulate in Indonesia’s capital Medan wrote that imams from the Muhammadiyah Muslim organisation were preaching that all communists should be killed, calling them the “lowest order of infidel, the shedding of whose blood is comparable to killing chicken.”
Britain also supported the massacres, documented by the historian Mark Curtis. Anti-communism appears to be on the rise in Indonesia, with rightwingers trying to shut down a meeting on the massacres just last month.
Source: Morning Star.
19th World Festival of Youth and Students: Russian authorities tried to prohibit communist symbols!

Thursday, October 19, 2017

https://communismgr.blogspot.com/2017/10/19th-world-festival-of-youth-and.html

19th World Festival of Youth and Students: Russian authorities tried to prohibit communist symbols!

With an intervention to the Embassy of the Russian Federation in Athens, the Communist Party of Greece (KKE) protested the unacceptable behaviour of the authorities in Sochi towards members of the Communist Youth of Greece (KNE) who were participating at the 19th Word Festival of Youth and Students

More specifically, as the 902 portal reports, the representatives of KNE faced unprecedented tight security measures and were prohibited from entering the festival venue because they had with them declarations for the 100 years of the October Revolution as well as communist banners with the sickle and hammer! 

 
On Wednesday, the members of KNE were detained by security forces for 30 minutes, while today, the authorities prohibited the entrance to the representatives of KNE for almost 2 hours. The explanation by the Russian authorities was that “the sickle and hammer symbol is illegal and the declarations of KNE consist dangerous material”! Representatives from other Communist Youths condemned the behaviour of the Russian authorities and expressed their solidarity to the members of KNE.
 
Under the pretext of “security”, the Russian government seems to have unleashed an attack to freedoms and rights, by criminalizing communist symbols (e.g. sickle and hammer) and prohibiting delegations of Communist Youths from entering the Festival. 
 
In a letter addressed to the Russian Embassy, the Communist Party of Greece complained about the behaviour of the authorities in Sochi, mentioning that the incident undoubtedly tarnishes such a big and important event. 

Video: Denouncing the incident during Festival’s seminar