Category: Palestinian struggle for equality
KKE: Solidarity with the struggle of the Palestinian political prisoners in Israeli jails

Wednesday, April 19, 2017

KKE: Solidarity with the struggle of the Palestinian political prisoners in Israeli jails

https://communismgr.blogspot.com/2017/04/kke-solidarity-with-struggle-of.html
The KKE expresses its solidarity with the struggle that thousands of Palestinian political prisoners in Israeli jails began on 17/4/2017 and demands their immediate release.
The KKE in general expresses its full support with the struggle of the Palestinian people against the Israeli occupation that has been going on for decades with the responsibility also of the USA, EU, NATO.
The SYRIZA-ANEL government bears enormous responsibilities because in the framework of the perpetuation of the occupation and intensification of the Israeli aggressiveness against the Palestinian people it implements a policy of deepening-reinforcing political-military and economic relations with the state of Israel.
The KKE calls on the Greek people to intensify their support for the struggle of the Palestinians against the settlements, the imprisonments and every kind of repressive measure, for an independent Palestinian state, on the 1967 borders, with East Jerusalem as its capital, with the people sovereign.
International Relations Section of the CC of the KKE.
18.4.17.
Lack of Palestinian State ‘Unfair’ and a ‘Terrible Injustice’ – China
Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi meets with  Palestinian Foreign Minister Riyad al-Maliki, April 2017

Lack of Palestinian State ‘Unfair’ and a ‘Terrible Injustice’ – China

© AP Photo/ Mark Schiefelbein
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https://sputniknews.com/politics/201704141052656566-china-supports-independent-palestinian-state/

On Thursday, during the visit of Palestinian Foreign Affairs Minister Riyad al-Maliki to Beijing, China said it was a “terrible injustice” that Palestine still does not have its own independent state.

During a press conference with Maliki, Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi reaffirmed Beijing’s support for a Palestinian state based on borders that existed before the Six-Day War in 1967, with a capital in East Jerusalem.

Wang said, “Seventy years later, what we see is that our Palestinian brothers have yet to establish an independent state with full sovereignty … This is unfair, and this terrible injustice must be addressed, and it cannot continue,” according to German media outlet DPA.

The pre-1967 borders have been called “indefensible” by Israel, though former US President Barack Obama and others have voiced their support for those demarcations.

Wang also said that Beijing supports the 2002 Arab Peace Initiative, which seeks to normalize relations between Arab states and Israel and calls for Israel to be recognized as a state on the condition that Tel Aviv helps facilitate the creation of a Palestinian state by ceding its territorial control to the pre-war borders.

Beijing supports the two-state solution as well. Maliki agreed that this was the best course of action, saying that the “cornerstone of the fight against terrorism” would be the establishment of a Palestinian state.

He added, “We do encourage China to do more of this kind of approach, in order to see peace ultimately achieved in our region.”

Wang remarked, “Despite all the hotspot issues popping up in the Middle East, the issue of Palestine remains the central issue.” He pledged that Beijing would furnish more than $7 million in humanitarian aid to assist in the construction of a solar power station.

This support has not affected China’s relationship with Israel, however, as a new series of technology cooperation programs were established last month during a visit from Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

Before arriving in China Netanyahu’s office released a statement saying, “We will continue the talks on establishing a free trade agreement between China and Israel and we will hold the third joint Israel-China innovation conference. Of course we are continuing to develop new markets and to open new markets for the Israeli economy.”

The workers of the World expressed their Internationalist Solidarity with the Palestinian People on March 30th

The WFTU Day of Solidarity with the Palestinian People was honoured with various initiatives all over the world, yesterday on March 30th 2017. The WFTU affiliates and friends responded to the WFTU Call: “On 30rd of March, all workers and ordinary people of the working class worldwide are called upon to give real expression to their solidarity with the people of Palestine against Israeli aggressiveness and occupation”.

The workers, the ordinary people which took part in the initiatives of the Class Oriented trade unions proved that Palestinian people are not alone, they demanded to STOP the Israeli Settlements,  the recognition of a free and independent Palestinian state within the borders of 1967, with East Jerusalem as its capital.

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The Terrible Seeds of the Attack on the British Parliament

Flowers are laid at the scene after an attack on Westminster Bridge in London, Britain, March 22, 2017.

The Terrible Seeds of the Attack on the British Parliament

© REUTERS/ Hannah McKay

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Alexander Mercouris
Westminster Attack (48)
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https://sputniknews.com/columnists/201703251051935003-london-attack-terrible-seeds/

The attack on the British Parliament is a terrible tragedy and a hideous crime.

On March 23, Daesh terrorist group has claimed responsibility for the deadly Westminster attack in the British capital.

This fact should underscore a bitter truth that Western political establishments persist in resisting.  This is that it is impossible to fight terrorism effectively in Europe if it is supported — however discretely — in the Middle East.

The origins of today’s Jihadist movement go back to the 1980s when Western governments, including the British government, actively supported the Jihadist war against the Soviet backed in Afghanistan.  This war radicalised a whole generation of young Muslims in Europe and the Middle East, with the active support of Western governments.  I well remember the articles and documentaries supporting the Jihadist struggle in Afghanistan which proliferated in the Western media at this time, which included turning a blind eye to Jihadi atrocities in Afghanistan and to the role Jihadi groups were playing in heroin trafficking, which caused an explosion in heroin addiction in the West (especially in Britain) at that time.

More pertinently, this support for the Jihadi movement in Afghanistan led to the British authorities turning a blind eye to the establishment of a Jihadist network in mosques and community centres across Britain.  There were rumours at the time — never fully confirmed or denied — that an implicit agreement had been reached between the British authorities and Jihadi leaders that the British authorities would tolerate their activities in Britain provided they undertook no violent action on British soil.To add to the toxic brew, it was also roughly at this time that a wave of funding from the Gulf region transformed the teaching of Islam in British mosques and Muslim community centres, changing Wahhabist/Salafi doctrines from a marginal influence within Britain Islam increasingly into its mainstream.

The British authorities have struggled to get on top of these Wahhabist/Salafist Jihadist networks that were established in Britain in the 1980s ever since.

In recent years the British authorities have made their problems worse by embracing the Jihadist struggle against President Assad’s government in Syria.  Instead of recognising President Assad and his government for what they are — a bulwark against the spread of Jihadi terrorism in the Middle East and elsewhere — the British authorities have been relentless in demanding President Assad’s overthrow, so that just as in the 1980s they supported the Jihadist struggle against the government of Afghanistan, so today they have been de facto supporting the Jihadist struggle against the Syrian government.

Needless to say this has given fresh life to the Jihadist networks which have become established in Britain, further radicalising a section of British Muslim youth, and legitimising Jihadism amongst them.

The result is that there has been a regular trickle of British Muslim volunteers joining the Jihadi struggle in Syria, where they have learnt to bear arms and become further indoctrinated in Jihadist ways of thinking.  To the British government’s embarrassment some of them have become so radicalised that they have become suicide bombers.

To compound the folly of all this, at the same time that the British government has been de facto supporting the Jihadists’ struggle in Syria, it has also been acting in a way that can be made to fit in with the Jihadists’ narrative of a Western/Christian plot against Islam.

In 2001 and 2003 Britain participated in the US invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq, Britain has become an increasingly uncritical supporter of Israeli actions in the Palestinian territories, and more recently Britain has joined the US’s anti-Daesh coalition in Iraq and Syria, even if its actual military contribution to the anti-Daesh struggle has been minimal and ineffective.The result unsurprisingly is that Britain, along with other Western countries, now finds itself home to an indeterminate number of angry, violent and deluded people, who it simultaneously supports and fights against.

That this is a recipe for disaster should hardly require explanation.  Tragically that disaster has now  happened.

If Jihadi terrorism is to be defeated — something by the way which is fully possible — then the point has to be grasped both in Britain and the West in general that terrorism is not terrorism only if it happens in London or Paris or Brussels or Nice.  It is also terrorism if it happens in Aleppo or Mosul or Grozny or Damascus.  Jihadi terrorism has to be fought everywhere it happens, not simultaneously opposed and supported in order to achieve some nebulous geopolitical objectives of no interest to the Western public.

Unfortunately we seem in Britain to be as far away from that realisation as ever, and until it finally comes there can be no confidence that the tragedy in London will be the last one.

The views expressed in this article are solely those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official position of Sputnik.

On Anti-Semitism, Israel, and the Palestinians

On Anti-Semitism, Israel, and the Palestinians

http://www.commondreams.org/views/2017/02/28/anti-semitism-israel-and-palestinians
Portside Date:
February 28, 2017
Author:
Bernie Sanders
Date of Source:
Tuesday, February 28, 2017
Common Dreams/Haaretz

The following transcript, as published by Haaretz [1], is the full speech given by Sen. Bernie Sanders to the J Street 2017 conference in Washington, D.C. on February 27, 2017:

Thank you for inviting me to address you here today. It’s a pleasure to be here with J Street, which has been such a strong voice for saner, more progressive foreign policy ideas. And I am delighted to be in the company of friends from the Middle East and all over the world who I know will continue the struggle for a world of peace, justice and environmental sanity.

Let me begin by noting that in the last several months, since Donald Trump’s victory in the presidential race, there has been a significant outbreak of anti-Semitism here in our country. I am very alarmed by the desecration of Jewish cemeteries, with Jewish Community Centers being threatened around the country, and with the headquarters of the Anti-Defamation League receiving a bomb threat last week.

When we see violent and verbal racist attacks against minorities – whether they are African-Americans, Jews, Muslims in this country, immigrants in this country, or the LGBT community, these attacks must be condemned at the highest levels of our government.

It was rather extraordinary that in the White House’s Holocaust Remembrance Day statement, the murder of 6 million Jews was not mentioned by the Trump administration. I hope very much that Pres. Trump and his political advisor Mr. Bannon understand that the world is watching: it is imperative that their voices be loud and clear in condemning anti-Semitism, violent attacks against immigrants in this country, including the murder of two young men from India, and all forms of bigotry here and around the world. This country has struggled too long against racism, sexism, xenophobia, and homophobia. We will not go back. We are going to go forward and fight discrimination of all forms.

I must say that I also found it very troubling that, at a recent press conference, when President Trump was given an opportunity to condemn the bigotry and anti-Semitism that has arisen in the wake of his election, he chose to respond by bragging – incorrectly, by the way – about the size of his Electoral College victory. Our society is still riven by tensions from the campaign, and Americans need a president who will try to bring us together, rather than boast about his political victory.

Let me take this opportunity to thank J Street for the bold voice that they’ve provided in support of American leadership in the Middle East and efforts towards peace between Israelis and Palestinians. I understand that, given the political climate in this capital, that has not always been easy. I also applaud them for being part of a broad coalition of groups that successfully fought for the historic nuclear agreement between the U.S. and its partners and Iran.

That agreement demonstrated that real American leadership, real American power, is not shown by our ability to blow things up, but by our ability to bring parties together, to forge international consensus around shared problems, and then to mobilize that consensus to address those problems.


For many years, leaders across the world, especially Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, had sounded the alarm about the possibility of an Iranian nuclear weapon. What the Obama administration was able to do, with the support of groups like J Street and others, was to get an agreement that froze and dismantled large parts of that nuclear program, put it under the most intensive inspections regime in history, and removed the prospect of an Iranian nuclear weapon from the list of global threats.

As a member of the United States Senate, I hear a whole lot of speechifying. I hear from many of my colleagues how “tough” the United States has got to be, and how, at the end of the day, military force is what matters.

Well, I say to those colleagues, ‘It’s easy to give speeches in the safety of the floor of the Senate or the House. It’s a little bit harder to experience war and live through the devastation of war. I recall vividly all of the rhetoric that came from the Bush administration, that came from my Republican colleagues, and some Democrats, about why going to war in Iraq was the right thing to do. Well, it wasn’t. In fact, it is one of the great tragedies of modern world history.

Today it is now broadly acknowledged that the war in Iraq, which I opposed, was a foreign policy blunder of enormous magnitude. The war in Iraq led to the deaths of some 4,400 U.S. troops and the wounding, physical and emotional, of tens of thousands of others—not to mention the pain inflicted on wives and children and parents. The war in Iraq led to, conservatively speaking, the deaths of over 100,000 Iraqi civilians and the wounding and displacement of many more. It created a cascade of instability around the region that we are still dealing with today in Syria and elsewhere, and will be for many years to come. And, by the way, that war in Iraq cost trillions of dollars—money that should have been spent on health care, education, infrastructure, and environmental protection.

The Iraq war, like many other military conflicts, had unintended consequences. It ended up making us less safe, not more safe.

In contrast, the Iran nuclear deal helped the security of the U.S. and its partners – yes, it helped the security of Israel, as many Israeli security experts have acknowledged – and it did this at a tiny fraction of the cost in blood and treasure of the Iraq war. This is the power of diplomacy. This is real leadership.

Some who opposed this nuclear deal have attacked its supporters, including J Street, for being part of a so-called “echo chamber.” The truth is that Washington has for many years had a very loud and powerful echo chamber for war. It’s about time we had an echo chamber for peace. So thank you J Street.

Now, as many of you know, I have a connection to the State of Israel going back many years. In 1963, I lived on a kibbutz near Haifa. It was there that I saw and experienced for myself many of the progressive values upon which the State of Israel was founded. I think it is very important for everyone, but particularly for progressives, to acknowledge the enormous achievement of establishing a democratic homeland for the Jewish people after centuries of displacement and persecution, and particularly after the horror of the Holocaust.

But as you all know, there was another side to the story of Israel’s creation, a more painful side. Like our own country, the founding of Israel involved the displacement of hundreds of thousands of people already living there, the Palestinian people. Over 700,000 people were made refugees.

To acknowledge this painful historical fact does not “delegitimize” Israel, any more than acknowledging the Trail of Tears delegitimizes the United States of America.

But I didn’t come here today simply to revisit history, or to say one historical narrative is wrong and one is right. My question here today is: OK, what now? Where do Israelis and Palestinians go from here? What should be U.S. policy to end this conflict, to end this fifty-year long occupation, and enable a better, more secure and prosperous future for Jews and Arabs, Israelis and Palestinians alike?

This decades-long conflict has taken so much from so many. Nobody gains when Israel spends an enormous part of its budget on the military. Nobody gains when Gaza is obliterated and thousands are killed, wounded, or made homeless. Nobody gains when children are trained to be suicide bombers. Nobody gains when year after year, decade after decade, the talk is about war and hatred rather than peace and development. Think of the incredible potential that is being lost when Israelis and Palestinians are not coming together effectively to address the environmental and economic challenges of the region. Our vision, a vision we must never lose sight of, is creating a Middle East where people come together in peace and democracy to create a region in which all people have a decent life. I understand that, given the realities of today, that vision appears distant and maybe even far-fetched. But it is a vision and a dream that we cannot afford to give up on.

So what should we as progressives – American progressives, Israeli progressives and progressives globally — demand of our governments in bringing this future about?

Let’s take a moment to talk about values.

It’s often said that the U.S.-Israel relationship is based on “shared values.” I think this is correct, but then we also have to ask: What do we mean by this? What values are we talking about?

As progressives, here are the values we share: We believe in democracy. We believe in equality. We believe in pluralism. We are strongly opposed to xenophobia. We respect and we will protect the rights of minorities.

These are values that are shared by progressives in this country and across the globe. These values are based upon the very simple notion that we share a common humanity. Whether we are Israelis or Palestinians or Americans, whether we are Jews, Christians, Muslims, or of another religion, we all want our children to grow up healthy, to have a good education, have decent jobs, drink clean water and breathe clean air, and to live in peace.

That’s what being human is about. And our job is to do everything that we can to oppose all of the political forces, no matter what side they may be on, who try to tear us apart.

Earlier this month, at a White House press conference with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, President Trump was asked whether he supported a two-state solution. His answer was, “I’m looking at two-state and one-state, and I like the one that both parties like.” As if someone asked him whether he preferred Coke to Pepsi.

We should be clear: The two-state solution, which involves the establishment of a Palestinian state in the territories occupied in 1967, has been bipartisan U.S. policy for many years. It is also supported by an overwhelming international consensus, which was reaffirmed in December by the United Nations Security Council Resolution 2334. While I understand that they’ve walked that statement back, the casual manner in which President Trump appeared to abandon that policy was extremely concerning, but also unfortunately typical of the carelessness with which he has managed American foreign policy thus far.

The president said that he supports a peace deal, but this doesn’t mean much. The real question is: Peace on what terms, and under what arrangement? Does “peace” mean that Palestinians will be forced to live under perpetual Israeli rule, in a series of disconnected communities in the West Bank and Gaza? That’s not tolerable, and that’s not peace.

If Palestinians in the occupied territories are to be denied self-determination in a state of their own, will they receive full citizenship and equal rights in a single state, potentially meaning the end of a Jewish majority state? These are very serious questions with significant implications for America’s broader regional partnerships and goals.

Friends, the United States and the State of Israel have a strong bond, going back to the moment of Israel’s founding. There is no question that we should be, and will be Israel’s strong friend and ally in the years to come. At the same time, we must recognize that Israel’s continued occupation of Palestinian territories and its daily restrictions on the political and civil liberties of the Palestinian people runs contrary to fundamental American values.

As former Secretary of State John Kerry rightly said in his speech in December, ‘Friends need to tell each other the hard truths.’ And the hard truth is that the continued occupation and the growth of Israeli settlements that the occupation sustains, undermines the possibility of peace. It contributes to suffering and violence.

As the United Nations Security Council reaffirmed on December 23, the settlements also constitute a flagrant violation of international law. I applaud the Obama administration’s decision to abstain from vetoing UN Security Council Resolution 2334. Those of us who really support Israel have got to tell the truth about policies are hurting chances of reaching a peaceful resolution.

I recognize that the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is one of the most emotionally fraught issues in U.S. politics, involving as it does the legitimate historical claims, identities and security of two peoples in the same region.

So let me be very clear: to oppose the policies of a right-wing government in Israel does not make one anti-Israel or an anti-Semite. We can oppose the policies of President Trump without being anti-American. We can oppose the policies of Netanyahu without being anti-Israel.  We can oppose the policies of Islamic extremism without being anti-Muslim.

As I said during my presidential campaign, peace means security not only for every Israeli, but also for every Palestinian. It means supporting self-determination, civil rights, and economic well-being for both peoples.

These ideas are based in the very same shared values that impel us to condemn anti-Semitic bigotry, condemn anti-Muslim bigotry, and to make our own society better. These are the ideas that should guide us. The values of inclusiveness, security, democracy, and justice should inform not only America’s engagement with Israel and Palestine, but with the region and the world.

The United States will continue its unwavering commitment to the safety of the State of Israel, but we must also be clear that peacefully resolving this conflict is the best way to ensure the long-term safety of both peoples, and for making America more secure.

To my Israeli friends here with us today: we share many of the same challenges. In both our countries we see the rise of a politics of bigotry and intolerance and resentment. We must meet these challenges together. As you struggle to make your society better, more just, more egalitarian, I want to say to you: Your fight is our fight.

Bernie Sanders [2] (I-Vt.) was elected to the U.S. Senate in 2006 after serving 16 years in the House of Representatives. He is the longest serving independent member of Congress in American history. Elected Mayor of Burlington, Vt., by 10 votes in 1981, he served four terms. Before his 1990 election as Vermont’s at-large member in Congress, Sanders lectured at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard and at Hamilton College in upstate New York. Read more at his website [3]. Follow him on Twitter: @SenSanders or @BernieSanders

Common Dreams – Winter Campaign [4]

KKE delegation in EU Parliament denounces plans to move US Embassy to Jerusalem

Sunday, January 29, 2017

KKE delegation in EU Parliament denounces plans to move US Embassy to Jerusalem

https://communismgr.blogspot.com/2017/01/kke-delegation-in-eu-parliament.html
KKE MEP Kostas Papadakis (up) submitted
the Question to EU’s Federica Morgherini.
In a Question submitted to the EU’s High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy Federica Mogherini, the KKE EU Parliament delegation denounces as “provocative” the US government’s announcement regarding the beginning of the procedure to move the US Embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. 
 
More specifically, the Question submitted by KKE MEP Kostas Papadakis is the following:
 
“It has been officially announced by the government of the United States that it starts the procedure for the transfer of the US Embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem which, as it was stated, is in “early stages”. This move was accompanied by the statements of the israeli occupational forces that they plan:
 
i) the construction of over 500 new residences for israeli settlers in East Jerusalem
 
ii) the construction 2,500 new residences for israeli settlers in West Bank.

These dangerous developments consist one more proof of the US and Israel’s aggressiveness in the region, in which the EU is traditionally in line. They create the soil for new escalation of the competitions in the region which, once more, will be paid by the blood of the people.
 
– What is the stance of the EU in the provocative announcement for the beginning of the US Embassy transfer’s procedure which encourages the aggresiveness of the israeli leadership and strengthens the occupation against the palestinian people?”
 
Source: 902.gr / Translation: In Defense of Communism

(Note: This is an unofficial translation of the Question from the original Greek text).
Is Trump about to spark a Third Intifada in Palestine?

https://www.rt.com/op-edge/374930-third-intifada-palestine-trump-netanyahu/

John Wight
John Wight has written for newspapers and websites across the world, including the Independent, Morning Star, Huffington Post, Counterpunch, London Progressive Journal, and Foreign Policy Journal. He is also a regular commentator on RT and BBC Radio. John is currently working on a book exploring the role of the West in the Arab Spring. You can follow him on Twitter @JohnWight1
Is Trump about to spark a Third Intifada in Palestine?
If reports are to be believed President Trump is planning to relocate the US embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, it will almost certainly be the catalyst for the explosion of a Third Intifada.

Though Western news pundits and journalists outdid themselves in claiming Trump’s election was being celebrated in Moscow as if Russia had most to gain from his presidency, the world leader with most reason to welcome Trump’s election was, in fact, Israel’s Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

Isolated on the international stage for his government’s intransigence where Palestinian human, civil and national rights are concerned, and having a terrible relationship with Obama, Trump has arrived in Washington proclaiming near-unconditional support for Israel’s current leader and government.

Recently, Netanyahu’s government has been condemned by the UN Security Council over the network of expanding illegal colonies on occupied Palestinian land, commonly referred to as settlements. Its embassy in London was embroiled in a scandal over the expose by undercover Al Jazeera journalists of a plot to undermine various British politicians and ministers over their opposition to those illegal colonies, and of course, the consistent and ongoing obduracy when it comes to the establishment of a viable Palestinian state. Take all this together, and the growing pariah status of the Netanyahu government was self-evident.

However, with Trump’s entry into the White House, all this is set to change. The 45th President has made no secret of his opposition to the Iran nuclear deal, designed to prevent the Iranians developing a nuclear weapon in return for the lifting of international sanctions. Negotiated between the Iranian government and the five permanent members of the UN Security Council plus Germany (p5+1) in 2015, the agreement counts as one of the Obama administration’s few foreign policy successes.

During the negotiations leading up to the agreement, Netanyahu caused controversy by attempting to scupper it, going so far as to appear at a joint session of the US Congress in Washington to speak out against it without first clearing his appearance with the White House, as per the usual protocol when it comes to visiting foreign heads of state. It was, in conjunction with congressional Republicans, a deliberate insult and clear attempt to undermine a sitting US president.

The key point is that despite Trump’s bluster about Iran and the Iran deal, the alternative to it is war. To remind both him and those of the same mind, such a war would make the current chaos and conflict in the region tame by comparison.

Here it’s worth recalling that the US failed in its objective of turning Iraq, a country starved to its knees during thirteen years of brutal sanctions, into a pliant US satellite. Its military forces were unable to pacify the country, as they have been unable to pacify Afghanistan, which is why the incoherence and recklessness of Trump’s foreign policy pronouncements on Iran provide legitimate cause for trepidation.

The two states in the Middle East most responsible for creating instability and conflict in the region over its recent history are Israel and Saudi Arabia. Both were founded and exist on a sectarian basis, and both have regional hegemonic agendas. Both also view Iran as the greatest obstacle when it comes to achieving those plans. When it comes to Palestine only the most deluded or dishonest still regards the prospect of a two-state solution possible. Netanyahu leads the most extreme government the country has had in many years, made up of assorted ultra-nationalists and even racists where the status of the Palestinians are concerned.

Under international law, Jerusalem is not and never has been part of Israel. Its agreed status under the UN Partition Plan of 1947 was a separate ‘international city.’ However, in the course of what Israel refers to as its war of independence and the Palestinians as ‘al-Nakba’ (the Catastrophe) in 1948, control of the city was split between Israel and Jordan, over West and East Jerusalem respectively. This changed after the Six Day War of 1967, when the Israeli’s took control of the entire city, though without UN or international sanction. Since that time, the Palestinians have considered East Jerusalem to be the capital of any future Palestinian state, even though the Israelis have been destroying Palestinian homes and building settlements across this part of the city.

It is hard to know if Trump and his team are aware of the consequences if the US becomes the only country to locate its embassy in Jerusalem, or if they know full well what the consequences will be and don’t care. Regardless, those consequences will be to unite the Palestinians in resistance to the move and to the Netanyahu government such as they have not been united since the First Intifada of 1987-1993.

It would also place Russia in a sensitive position, given the influence and trust it now enjoys as a force for stability in the region. Indeed it was no accident that Moscow recently hosted high-level talks between Fatah, Hamas, and Islamic Jihad that concluded with the formation of a united Palestinian National Council, whose writ will run both in Gaza and across the occupied West Bank.

Mr. Trump cannot logically describe the foreign policy of his predecessor in the Middle East a disaster but then take decisions that are equally disastrous. His administration needs to understand that justice for the Palestinian people is not an optional extra. Justice for the Palestinians is a non-negotiable condition of peace and stability.

The statements, views and opinions expressed in this column are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of RT.