Category: struggle against fascism
KKE: Condemns the fascist attack on the Communist Party of Paraguay’s headquarters in Asunción

Tuesday, November 21, 2017

KKE: Condemns the fascist attack on the Communist Party of Paraguay’s headquarters in Asunción

 https://communismgr.blogspot.com/2017/11/kke-condemns-fascist-attack-on.html
In a message of solidarity towards the Communist Party of Paraguay (Partido Comunista Paraguayo), the Press Office of the CC of the Communist Party of Greece states the following:
“The KKE decisively condemns the attack by a group of fascsist against the headquarters of the Communist Party of Paraguay in Asunción, the desecration of the offices’ entrance with vulgar anticommunist slogals and the destruction of a mural dedicated to the October Revolution.
This attack is not the first one; a similar event had occured in 2014, for which there was never a substantial action or response from the side of the state, despite the complaints of the PCP.
The government of Paraguay bears serious responsibilities because it leaves free space to the undisturbed activity of fascist gangs, while on the same time it escalates repression and persecutions against the workers-people’s struggles.
The KKE expresses its solidarity to the CP of Paraguay. It demands the clarification of the incident and the punishment of the perpetrators, the safeguarding of the free political and trade-unionist action of the communists and of the people’s movement in general.
The popular strata of Paraguay must think that the attacks on communists always consist a precursor to broader attack against the workers-peoples’ rights and freedoms. They must isolate such forces, express their solidarity and support towards the CP of Paraguay and strengthen their struggle for their rights.
Source: 902.gr / Translation: In Defense of Communism.
The Soviet WWII Counteroffensive That Changed the Course of History
| November 19, 2017 | 6:16 pm | Action, Red Army, Russia, struggle against fascism, USSR | No comments

https://sputniknews.com/military/201711191059238666-stalingrad-75th-anniversary-analysis/

The Soviet WWII Counteroffensive That Changed the Course of History

Battles in Stalingrad

The Soviet WWII Counteroffensive That Changed the Course of History

© Sputnik/ Natalya Bode

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Sunday marks the 75th anniversary of the beginning of the Soviet counteroffensive at Stalingrad, a dramatic battle that routed Axis armies and became the turning point in the war against the Nazis. Russian military journalist Andrei Stanavov looks back on the key events of the battle and its lessons.

Between late 1942 and early 1943, along the snow-covered steppes off the banks of the Volga River, the Nazi war machine suffered the most devastating defeat in its history – one from which it would never fully recover.

The Soviet counteroffensive around Stalingrad, known as ‘Operatsiya Uran’ (Operation Uranus) started on November 19, and continued until February 2, 1943. The daring operation, planned by Soviet High Command and executed by Generals Georgy Zhukov, Konstantin Rokossovsky, Alexander Vasilevsky and Nikolai Vatutin, culminated in the encirclement and liquidation of a 300,000+ Wehrmacht army group led by Field Marshal Friedrich Paulus and units from Germany’s Axis partners.

‘Hell on Earth’

The battle was preceded by the Nazi offensive into southern Russia and the Caucasus in the summer of 1942, during which Nazi Germany reached the zenith of its territorial gains following its invasion of the USSR. Among the goals of the operation was Stalingrad, the strategic industrial city on the Volga with the additional, symbolic importance of carrying the namesake of Soviet leader Josef Stalin, the commander in chief of the Red Army.

Wehrmacht troops in the ruins of Stalingrad, September 1942
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Wehrmacht troops in the ruins of Stalingrad, September 1942

For over two months, Nazi mechanized units, artillery and aviation advanced on Stalingrad, pressing against the Soviet 62nd and 64th Armies and methodically razing the city itself to the ground.

“Nevertheless,” Russian military journalist and RIA Novosti contributor Andrei Stanavov recalled, “the enemy did not succeed in taking the embankment of the Volga and the city center, in spite of their fivefold superiority in numbers and firepower.”

“Stalingrad is hell on earth – Verdun – beautiful Verdun, with new weapons. We attack on a daily basis. If in the morning we manage to advance 20 meters, in the evening the Russians throw us backward.” This was how Wehrmacht private Walter Oppermann described the Stalingrad campaign, in a letter to his brother dated November 18, 1942, one day before the start of the Soviet counteroffensive.

Soviet troops defend a house in Stalingrad
© Sputnik/ George Zelma
Soviet troops defend a house in Stalingrad

Loathe to comparisons of Stalingrad to the bloody WWI meat grinder, Hitler demanded that his generals throw their battered units into Stalingrad again and again. The last push, which began in the fall and involved five infantry and two tank divisions, was halted by Vasily Chuikov’s depleted and pocketed but defiant 62nd Army, which refused to give a single street, house, or room to the enemy without a fight.

“By mid-November, the Germans had been halted along the entire front and forced to switch to defense and entrenchment,” Stanavov wrote. “In total, over 1,000 German tanks, 1,400 aircraft, 2,000 guns and mortars were lost, and 700,000 Wehrmacht soldiers and officers died or were wounded before the impenetrable walls of the city. Quickly assessing the situation, Soviet High Command decided not to give the enemy any time to rest, deciding instead on beginning a crushing counterblow.”

German troops passing through a wrecked generating station in the factory district of Stalingrad on Dec. 28, 1942
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German troops passing through a wrecked generating station in the factory district of Stalingrad on Dec. 28, 1942

With the Nazis bogged down in and around the city, the Red Army amassed a powerful grouping of forces from the South-Western, Don, Stalingrad and Voronezh fronts and concentrated them at Stalingrad, reinforcing them with mechanized units from the reserve. The group included more than a million troops, 15,000 guns and mortars, about 2,000 aircraft, and 1,500 tanks and self-propelled artillery pieces.

“By November 1942, from the operational point of view, the Wehrmacht was not in the most favorable position on the approaches to Stalingrad,” the military journalist explained. “Focused on their assault, the Germans moved their best strike formations into the city, covering the flanks with weak Romanian and Italian divisions. It would be against them that the powerful dual blows from the Red Army forces in the South-Western and Stalingrad fronts would come. Soviet command chose the Serafimovich and Keltskaya areas as the bridgeheads for the assaults, as well as the Sarpinsky Lakes area, located to the south of the city.”

Soviet troops in action using anti-tank rifles around Stalingrad
© Sputnik/ Georgi Zelma
Soviet troops in action using anti-tank rifles around Stalingrad

‘Stunned and Confused’

On November 19, troops from the South-Western Front under the command of Colonel-General Vatutin and part of the Don Front started their offensive. Striking the Axis grouping in its left flank from the north in a lightening advance, the Red Army broke through the Romanian 3rd Army’s defenses, driving enemy forces back 35 km. A day later, rifle divisions from the Stalingrad Front commanded by Colonel-General Andrei Yeremenko struck from the southeast, smashing the 4th Romanian Army and advancing 30 km, softening up enemy entrenchments with 80 minutes of concentrated artillery fire.

One German intelligence officer later recalled the impending disaster about to befall the Wehrmacht: “Stunned and confused, we did not take our eyes off the maps…Thick red lines and arrows indicated the directions of the multiple enemy attacks, flanking maneuvers, and areas where they had broken through. With all our foreboding, we could not even imagine the possibility of such a tremendous catastrophe!”

Consolidating its breakthroughs, the Red Army then began moving the breakthrough groups toward one another. On November 22, the Soviet 26th Tank Corps seized the bridge across the Don and took the town of Kalach –directly behind the German 6th Army and elements of the 4th Panzer Corps. In the space of a few days, the Red Army proceeded to create an iron ring around the 300,000-strong Axis force, including German, Romanian, Italian, Croatian and collaborationist units from the occupied Soviet territories, trapping 22 German divisions and over 160 individual units. By November 30, enemy attempts to break out of the encirclement were stopped.

Stanavov recalled: “The surrounded Axis troops occupied an area covering over 1,500 square km; the length of the perimeter of the pocket stretched 174 km…Deprived of food, ammunition, fuel and medicine, Field Marshal Paulus’ soldiers and officers froze in —30 degree cold. Dying of hunger, they ate almost all of their horses, and hunted for dogs, cats and birds. Notwithstanding the obvious hopelessness of the situation, directives ordering them to ‘fight to the end and not to surrender’ continued to come from Berlin.”

Fighting around Stalingrad, winter 1942/43
© Sputnik/ Oleg Knorring
Fighting around Stalingrad, winter 1942/43

Starting in December, Hermann Hoth’s 30-division-strong Army Group Don attempted to break through the ring in the area near the village of Kotelnikovo. They were met by the 122,000-troop-strong 2nd Guards Army commanded by Leiutenant General Rodion Malinovsky. In fierce battles, Hoth’s tanks got bogged down along the Myshkova River, and the offensive was stopped. Field Marshal Erich von Manstein, the commander of the operation, asked the Fuhrer to allow Paulus to attempt to break through to meet Hoth, but Hitler refused, believing the Sixth Army could still hold on to Stalingrad.

Turning Point in WWII

During fighting between January and early February 1943, the Red Army’s Don Front forces, commanded by General Konstantin Rokossovsky, gradually cut the encircled group up into several pieces and destroyed it. On January 31, Paulus and his command were captured, and promptly surrendered. Axis troops and officers surrendered in droves, notwithstanding orders from Berlin not to do so. The remainder of the 6th Army capitulated on February 2, 1943. An estimated 91,500 troops, including 2,500 officers and 24 generals were captured.

The last Nazi troops leaving liberated Stalingrad, 1943.
© Sputnik/ Georgy Zelma
The last Nazi troops leaving liberated Stalingrad, 1943.

For many years after the battle, Western historians accused the USSR of deliberately mistreating Axis prisoners of war. Soviet and Russian historians have gone on to counter the claims, pointing out that most of the enemy troops were taken into captivity after having been seriously weakened by the fighting and the ensuing three months of starvation while encircled.

In the first three months after their capture, the prisoner death rate at the specially organized Camp #108 outside Stalingrad’s working settlement at Beketovka was extremely high, with around 27,000 POWs having reportedly died on the way to the camp or shortly after arriving. About 35,100 others underwent treatment at hospitals set up at the camp; another 28,100 were sent to hospitals at other locations. Only about 20,000 of the prisoners were deemed capable of labor, and were sent to do construction work. Following the terrible spike in mortality in the first three months, mortality rates for the troops captured at Stalingrad stabilized, and between July 1943 and January 1949, a total of 1,777 prisoners perished. With the exception of those troops and officers convicted of war crimes, the last POWs from the Battle of Stalingrad were released to Germany in 1949.

Stalingrad became the main turning point in the European Theater of World War II, and Nazi Germany’s first major defeat following the air-based Battle of Britain in 1940. In 1943, after their defeat in the massive tank battles at Kursk, and the Allied invasion of Italy, the Nazis’ total and unconditional capitulation became only a matter of time. Stalingrad was the first nail in that coffin.

Far-right demonstrators give Nazi salute at Madrid march (VIDEO)
| November 18, 2017 | 8:48 pm | Spain, struggle against fascism | 1 Comment

https://www.rt.com/news/410255-nazi-salute-madrid-march/

Far-right demonstrators give Nazi salute at Madrid march (VIDEO)

Far-right demonstrators give Nazi salute at Madrid march (VIDEO)
Hundreds of people joined a march held by the far-right Spanish Falangist movement. Some demonstrators were spotted giving Nazi salutes and singing fascist anthems as they marched through the streets of Madrid.

On Friday, crowds took part in the march to commemorate Jose Antonio Primo de Rivera, the founder of Falange Espanola, who was executed by the Spanish Republican government on November 20, 1936. Created in 1933, Falange Espanola was a nationalist party inspired by Italian fascism.

People were seen lighting torches, holding their right arms aloft in far-right salutes and singing the Falangist anthem ‘Cara al Sol’ (Facing the Sun). The demonstrators marched holding banners belonging to the Falangist party and Spanish flags, and took a route from Genoa Street in Madrid to the Valley of the Fallen, to the northwest of the city.

READ MORE: Fascist salutes seen at pro-Spanish unity demos in Madrid, Barcelona (PHOTOS, VIDEO)

In October, protesters rallying for Spanish unity following the Catalan independence referendum were spotted giving fascist salutes both in Barcelona and Madrid. Back then, the participants also held banners linked to the Falangist party.

The USA, European Union and Ukraine denied to condemn Nazism at the UN General Assembly

Sunday, November 19, 2017

The USA, European Union and Ukraine denied to condemn Nazism at the UN General Assembly

https://communismgr.blogspot.com/2017/11/the-usa-european-union-and-ukraine.html
Hiding behind the pretext of “freedom of speech”, the United States– accompanied by Ukrainevoted against a resolution condemning the glorification of Nazism introduced to the Third Committee of the U.N. General Assembly by the Russian Federation. 
 
The resolution was approved by a recorded vote of 125 in favor to 2 against, with 51 abstentions. 
 
Among the abstentions are the countries of the European Union (including Greece), Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Turkey and Libya. 
Following the draft’s introduction, the United States representative proposed an amendment to the text that would change all sections deemed to violate- according to the US- individual freedoms of speech, thought, expression and association. The amendment was rejected by a recorded vote of 81 against, to 3 in favour (Israel, Ukraine, United States), with 73 abstentions.
Speaking after the draft, as a whole, was approved by a vote of 125 in favour to 2 against (Ukraine, United States), with 51 abstentions, several States commended efforts to combat Nazism, yet expressed concern over the scope of the draft.  
 
Showing the EU’s hypocrisy, Estonia’s delegate, on behalf of the European Union, said all contemporary forms of racism should be addressed in an impartial manner! We must remember that the government of Estonia- like other Baltic countries- have a leading role in glorifying Nazism during the last years, by honoring the Waffen-SS, organizing anticommunist fiestas and distorting history under the auspices of the European Union. 
 
No matter how hard they try to distort history, to glorify Nazism-Fascism and vilify Socialism-Communism, the historical truth is one and only: The Soviet Red Army and the peoples’ antifascist resistance crushed Nazism in WW2.
 
Golden Dawn’s fascists have no place in Santorini!

Monday, October 30, 2017

Golden Dawn’s fascists have no place in Santorini!

https://communismgr.blogspot.com/2017/10/golden-dawns-fascists-have-no-place-in.html
Around 20 Golden Dawn’s fascists tried to attack
a foreign student during the “OXI Day” parade.
“The fascist-nazi ideology has no place in our island” underlines the Santorini Party Organisation of the KKE in a statement issued regarding the racist incident of 28th October. 
 
Last Saturday, a group of around 20 Neo-Nazi Golden Dawn party members and “sympathizers” violently disrupted the traditional student parade for the “OXI Day” holiday celebration, because the flag-bearer was a foreign student. 
 
Just before the parade was about to start, the fascists of Golden Dawn wearing black t-shirts with “Hellas Ultra” printed on them, started shouting and terrorizing both the students who were getting ready for their parade and their parents. The police attempted to negotiate with them, but the atmosphere was already explosive.
 
The Santorini Party Organisation of the KKE strongly denounces the provocative and unacceptable behaviour of the fascists and calls “all parents, students and workers of the island, independently of race and religion, to condemn the fascist-nazi ideology wherever it appears”
 
The incident in Santorini island was also condemned by the Press Office of the CC of the KKE which issued the following comment:
 
“The cowardly attack of the Golden Dawn’s members to prevent an 11-year old student to hold the Greek flag, as well as their statement that the Greeks didn’t fight fascism and nazism but “the italian army”, shows their real nazist face. They are political descendants of those who were defeated in 1940-45 by the Great Antifascist Victory of the People and will be defeated again by the organised people’s struggle”.
As AfD joins Bundestag, thousands protest racism in Berlin

http://p.dw.com/p/2mJrV

 

As AfD joins Bundestag, thousands protest racism in Berlin

Two days before the new Bundestag convenes, protesters called on the German government not to tolerate right-wing hatred. The message was clearly directed at the far-right Alternative for Germany party.

 Permalink http://p.dw.com/p/2mK4H

Thousands gather in Berlin to condemn racism

On Tuesday, a far-right party will enter Germany’s parliament for the first time in nearly six decades. In an attempt to set the tone before the Alternative for Germany party (AfD) takes its seats in the Bundestag, at least 10,000 demonstrators turned out in front of Berlin’s Brandenburg Gate on Sunday, holding signs reading “My Heart Beats for Diversity,” “No AfD” and — playing on calls to cap the numbers of refugees allowed into the country — “Upper Limits on Nazis.”

The official title of the event, “Against Racism and Hate in the Bundestag,” didn’t explicitly mention the far-right party, which took 12.6 percent of the vote in national elections on September 24. But initiator Ali Can made clear who the intended recipient of the demonstration’s message was when he addressed the crowd.

“I’ve read the constitution and am somewhat shocked at some of the things politicians, especially the AfD, come out with,” Can said. “Have they even read Article 3? It explicitly states that no one shall be discriminated against or treated favorably because of where he comes from.”

The AfD swept into the Bundestag on a platform focused on hostility to refugees, the assertion that Germany is being “Islamified”, and the idea that migrants are a threat to law and order.

Can called for greater mutual respect in society and for politicians to lead the way, arguing that tolerance is in everyone’s interest.

“Even AfD politicians can be the victims of prejudice,” Can told DW. “We’re coming out here against racism and hatred in general, no matter where it comes from and at whom it’s directed.”

Can knows of what he speaks. The 23-year-old himself was once a refugee.

‘Clear, rigorous opposition’

Can, whose Turkish-Kurdish family fled southeastern Turkey for Germany when he was only 2 years old, is somewhat unusual among multicultural activists. For one, he seeks dialogue with the people he opposes.

Last year, for example, Can set up a “hotline for concerned citizens” who claimed to be worried about the negative effects that they believed migrants had had on Germany. Presenting himself as a “migrant you can trust,” Can posted his phone number on the internet — an act of considerable courage during an age in which hate speech and trolling have become so common — and encouraged AfD voters and supporters of the anti-immigration PEGIDA movement to call him with their questions.

Can is an unapologetic idealist who knows how to mobilize people and attract publicity to his cause. Sunday’s demonstration was organized at a furious pace after the election and was supported by more than a dozen prominent activist groups.

The turnout won’t likely do anything to change the minds of the Bundestag’s AfD deputies. Those with more political experience than Can point out that more than noble sentiments will be needed to impose limits on the AfD’s legislators.

“If you look at the list of the parliamentarians who will be joining the Bundestag, there are unfortunately a whole series of them who’ve attracted attention in the past with right-wing extremist or racist statements,” Anton Hofreiter, the joint parliamentary leader of the Greens, told DW. “It’s important to combat them with clear, rigorous opposition.”

Demonstration against AfD in Bundestag The protesters are anxious as the far-right party prepares to enter the Bundestag

The anti-AfD majority

Political realism did not deter Hofreiter from joining the ranks of the demonstrators who marched from the Brandenburg Gate to the Victory Column and the Reichstag, and then back to the Brandenburg Gate for a concert featuring the Berlin hip-hop and reggae band Culcha Candela.

“What we want to do today is to send a signal,” singer Johnny Strange told DW. “Some 13 percent of voters chose the AfD in the election, but there’s a large majority (who didn’t), and I think they should be seen and heard.”

he crowd that showed up on Sunday was an example of the diversity of German society. Some of the protesters had immigration backgrounds; others came out of a sense of duty stemming from the country’s Nazi past.

“I was born in Korea, but I grew up in Germany and have lived here for 40 years,” one woman said. “I want to say: ‘This is my land.’ I think in a democracy you have to fight for that.”

“I think as a German you have a responsibility to ensure that parties like the AfD never again have the final say in German politics,” a man said.

When pressed on what concrete measures they wanted German politicians to take, many of the protesters were at something of a loss. But they were clear that they do not want the Bundestag to become a forum for racist and xenophobic sentiments. And that was reason enough to take to the streets on a fine late-autumn day to vent their unease with the AfD.

DW recommends

US Role in 1960s Indonesia Anti-Communist Massacre Revealed
Indonesia elite troops parade in Bandung, June 1966. The red caps are paratroopers in red berets.

US Role in 1960s Indonesia Anti-Communist Massacre Revealed

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Asia & Pacific

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Thirty thousand pages of files have been released on US activities in Indonesia during the archipelago’s gory transition from a socialist dictatorship to a pro-West military dictatorship in the mid-60s. The documents confirm that Washington was aware of, and supported, the military takeover of the government and purge of communist opponents.

The anti-communist purges in 1965 and 1966 were horrific, described by the CIA as “one of the worst mass murders of the 20th century.” Between 400,000 and 1 million accused leftists were killed, with some estimates going as far as to place the figure at 3 million.

It has long been known that the US and allied governments supported the 1965 military takeover. The US embassy, as well as the CIA, have been accused of providing weapons, economic assistance, and training to Suharto’s forces as well as lists of names of 5,000 communists. The embassy asserted in 1990 that the list in question was compiled by a single official acting on his own direction, and scholars debated whether or not the US helped facilitate the mass killings.

One of the newly released cables came from the embassy’s first secretary, Mary Vance Trent, who told Washington about a “fantastic switch which has occurred over 10 short weeks” that saw an estimated 100,000 people slaughtered.

A particularly shocking 1966 cable from CIA officer Edward Masters discussed the “problem” of captured communist prisoners. “Many provinces appear to be successfully meeting this problem by executing their [communist] prisoners, or killing them before they are captured, a task in which Muslim youth groups are providing assistance,” Masters reportedly said.

The documents were compiled in 2001 by the US State Department and subsequently classified, only to be released today. “We frankly do not know whether the real figure is closer to 100,000 or 1,000,000,” read an April 1966 cable attached to the 2001 report.

US Senator Tom Udall (D-NM), who introduced a bill in 2015 calling for the declassification of all US documents related to the matter as well as Indonesia to create a truth and reconciliation committee on the massacre, praised the release of documents. “These documents will provide greater transparency about the United States’ support for the Indonesian government during the same period that these horrible crimes were committed,” Udall said in a statement.

“Today represents real progress. But in Indonesia, many of the individuals behind these murders continue to live with impunity, and the victims and their descendants continue to be marginalized and unrecognized. These injustices are holding back Indonesia from achieving reconciliation and realizing its democratic potential. Here in the United States, we must encourage the continued democratic progress of a vital ally, and we must confront our own role in these terrible acts. Only by acknowledging the truth about our own history will the United States be able to speak out forcibly and credibly to defend human rights in the future.”

Indonesia, which had been a loose colony of the Netherlands for centuries, declared their independence in August 1945 and created the modern state of Indonesia, with the socialist and anti-imperialist Sukarno as the new nation’s first president. Sukarno attempted to balance the military, political Islam and communism in a policy called “Nasakom” and was a founding member of the Non-Aligned Movement with other formerly colonized countries like Egypt and India.

But over time, Sukarno favored his communist allies more, especially those abroad in China and the Soviet Union. Poverty and hunger besieged the world’s third largest communist country, and Indonesia accrued huge debts to Beijing and Moscow. Sukarno also cracked down on Islamists and attempted to weaken the society’s military elements through measures like the creation of a communist-aligned peasant militia.

After a failed coup against Sukarno in September 1965 that the military blamed on the Indonesian communist party and Chinese actors, the nation quickly dissolved into a brief but extremely bloody purge. The military and Islamists allied to annihilate Sukarno’s regime, slaughtering the communist party’s leadership. The documents also suggested that the US embassy had credible evidence that the coup was not orchestrated by the communists — later analysis would question the Indonesian military’s claim, and the culprits and motivation behind the coup attempt remain under dispute.

The rebellion’s leader, Major General Suharto, seized control of the presidency and placed Sukarno under house arrest, where he died in 1970 of kidney failure. Suharto would remain the nation’s US-friendly military dictator until he was forced to resign in 1998.

The legacy of the massacre remains complicated in Indonesia. School textbooks briefly discuss a “patriotic campaign,” a national uprising where 80,000 communist oppressors were killed. A 2016 symposium meant to discuss the tragedy was met with severe backlash, and in September 2017 an anti-communist mob disrupted a meeting of activists to discuss the massacre.