Category: Jeremy Corbyn
London Calling: Britain’s Communist Parties react on the outcome of the General Elections

Saturday, June 10, 2017

London Calling: Britain’s Communist Parties react on the outcome of the General Elections

https://communismgr.blogspot.com/2017/06/london-calling-britains-communist.html

Note: In this blog we are highly critical about Jeremy Corbyn, who we regard as a political representative of social democracy. Mr. Corbyn and his politics have nothing to do with marxism-leninism; on the contrary, we view Corbyn’s leadership and the Labour Party in general as a bourgeois political power which, like the Tories, aims to manage the capitalist system. However, despite any disagreements and with full respect to their choice, we present the reactions of the British Communist Parties on the outcome of the recent elections. 
COMMUNIST PARTY OF BRITAIN.

Communist Party General Secretary Robert Griffiths issued the following statement at 7.50 am, June 9th:

“Twelve million people have voted for a left-wing Labour manifesto and a majority of electors have rejected austerity policies. The Tories have no mandate for five months of public spending cuts, never mind another five years. In raising Labour’s share of the poll by 10 percentage points to almost match the Tories, enthusing huge numbers of young people, Jeremy Corbyn and his leadership have been vindicated. So, too, has the emphasis placed by the Communist Party on the role of mass struggle and class politics in raising people’s class consciousness, confidence and political understanding. This will help bring further advances for Labour in the new election that will be necessary in the very near future, once Theresa May resigns”.

*  *  *

NEW COMMUNIST PARTY OF BRITAIN.

The following article, under the title “Get Ready For The Next Election” appears in the front page of the New Worker.

By Daphne Liddle.

THE ELECTION results are in; we have a hung parliament and Theresa May’s big gamble has turned into a fiasco for the Tories. The Tories remain the largest party in Parliament but they no longer have an overall majority.

May has refused to resign but has cobbled together an instant coalition with the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) and is going to attempt to govern on. But this government will be anything but ‘strong and stable’ — it will be very weak and its potential to do more damage through more cuts and privatisations is now severely curtailed. The DUP is very much opposed to the Tories’ austerity policies.

The right-wing press is savaging May’s reckless gamble with the electorate and her poor performance during the campaign. They have been particularly scathing about her cuts to police and security services during her term as Home Secretary, in the light of the recent terror attacks.

Senior Tories know their government is weak and vulnerable, and there will almost certainly have to be another election before the end of the year. And given her poor performance they will not want her leading them into that election campaign.

Meanwhile Jeremy Corbyn and John McDonnell have both said that Labour is prepared to form a minority government immediately without any formal coalition but just by presenting items from their manifesto and let the other parties support or not on a case by case basis — a principled position. And they are ready and willing to take up the Brexit negotiations.

Corbyn and McDonnell are prepared to talk to European leaders — an advance on the ‘poke-‘em-in-the-eye-and-run’ stance of the Tory negotiators. The Labour leaders may seem audacious right now because they have fewer seats than the Tories, but with the Tories at war with each other and the Brexit negotiations due to begin in just 10 days Labour’s offer may become a lifeline. Audacity is good.

Corbyn has called on May to resign now, he said: “The Prime Minister called this election because she wanted a mandate. Well the mandate she’s got is lost Conservative seats, lost votes, lost support and lost confidence. “I would have thought that’s enough to go, actually, and make way for a government that will be truly representative of all of the people of this country.”

Shadow foreign secretary Emily Thornberry said: “Obviously we’re disappointed if we’re not able to form a majority government.” But she added: “For us to have come from such a long way back, supposedly, to be in a position where we could form the next government is an extraordinary performance on behalf of the Labour Party and shows what we can do when we unite.”

Green Party co-leader Caroline Lucas said: “Any Green MPs elected tonight will do all they can to keep the Tories from Number 10, and back a Labour-led government on a case by case basis.”

Labour now is more united than it has been for a long time. Corbyn has proved he is very electable and far more in touch with the values of ordinary working class people in Britain than the careerist right-wing New Labourites who were so desperately trying to bring him down a year ago. Some of them are now acknowledging their mistakes. This does not mean that in a new general election campaign Corbyn would not come under renewed slander and misrepresentation.

It has been strange to see the usual TV pundits, including Alistair Campbell and Piers Morgan expressing, their astonishment — and, for the moment, respect — at Corbyn’s success. It just shows how out of touch they are with the public mood.They have been convinced the only issue at the general election has been Brexit. But for the majority of the working class, saving the NHS, low wages, ending austerity, the housing crisis, benefit sanctions — especially on the long-term sick and disabled — these are the issues that count and would be the same in or out of Europe.

These are the issues and concerns that unite workers, old and young, male and female, black and white, in our day-to-day struggle for survival. If Brexit had been a big issue for the voters then the Liberal Democrat vote would have been a lot bigger because that was the only party standing against Brexit.

Our class has won an advance — the Tories are in retreat but they are not yet defeated. But there is little doubt that the opportunity to complete that defeat will arise soon and we must be ready. But morale is high now so it will be easier.

*  *  *

COMMUNIST PARTY OF GREAT BRITAIN (MARXIST-LENINIST).

[To be added soon] IN DEFENSE OF COMMUNISM ©.

Αναρτήθηκε από In Defense of Communism

UK General Election: The People Defy the Gatekeepers
A voter arrives at a polling station in London, Britain June 8, 2017.

UK General Election: The People Defy the Gatekeepers

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Neil Clark
1706111
https://sputniknews.com/columnists/201706091054490263-uk-election-results-column/

The UK general election result of 2017, which sensationally saw Theresa May’s Conservative Party lose their parliamentary majority, and Labour receive its highest share of the vote for 20 years – once again left smug, know-it-all Establishment pundits with egg on their faces.

40% of the Britons who voted ended up endorsing a party led by a man unelected Gatekeepers repeatedly told us repeatedly was an “extremist” and “unelectable.”
Jeremy Corbyn was leading Labour off a cliff, the “experts” said. One “respected” commentator even said that the party under Corbyn could dip below 20% in the popular vote. The anti-Corbyn editor of the supposedly “left-of-center” New Statesman warned that Labour could lose 100 seats. The magazine’s political editor informed us in March that “Jeremy knows he can‘t do the job.”
In early April, the NS produced a cover which informed us “The Labour Party has collapsed.”

“Wanted — An Opposition,” the splash declared — with a picture of a pointing Lord Kitchener to press home the point.

Another anti-Corbyn commentator predicted “a political Armageddon.” While pro-Iraq war columnist Nick Cohen warned that Corbyn was going to bury the Labour Party. “Will there be 150, 125, 100 Labour MPs by the end of the flaying? My advice is to think of a number then halve it,” the great Observer sage wrote.

In the end, Labour got 262 seats.

Labour‘s moving away from the “center ground” these brilliant experts assured us (and by “center ground” they meant a continuation of the policies of war, austerity and privatization), would be utterly disastrous.

If Labour’s pre-election surge in the polls had elite pundits in a flap, it was nothing compared to the stunned disbelief when the Exit Poll was announced last night.
Beforehand, members of the “Establishment Journos Club” had been merrily tweeting each other with predictions of how big the Tory majority would be. It was beyond the comprehension of these absurd out-of-touch, mutual- prejudice re-enforcing stenographers that voters would defy the instructions of their “superiors” and vote in large numbers for a “hard-left, friend of terrorists/IRA supporting, anti-Semitism condoning, crimes-of-Milosevic-denying, NATO and Trident opposing, sandal-wearing Kumbaya-singing, enemy of Britain” (take your pick from the smears), like Jeremy Corbyn. But they did.
The “Labour surge” which some pundits said didn’t exist anyway, may not have been enough to make Labour the largest party, but it was enough to prevent a Tory majority. And that in itself is a quite remarkable achievement given how far Labour was behind in the polls when the election was called, and the overwhelmingly hostile media treatment of Jeremy Corbyn, including from allegedly “left-of-center” publications like the New Statesman.
The significance of what happened on Thursday, June 8, in Britain really cannot be overstated.
Theresa May called an early election — three years ahead of schedule — because she thought her party would annihilate the “useless” Bearded One and then — with a whopping big majority get through whatever policies they wanted. All she had to do was to robotically repeat the mantra “strong and stable government” and rely on faux-left media gatekeepers to smear Corbyn, McDonnell and co as “terrorists” and “extremists,” and a Tory landslide was guaranteed. But at 10pm on Thursday night, May and much of the British Establishment got the shock of their lives. What went wrong?
The Labour manifesto was labeled “the most expensive suicide note in history” by too clever-by-half pundits, but in fact, it was the Conservative manifesto which was suicidal.

It included genuinely extremist policies, like the “triple-whammy” for pensioners which saw it lose votes up and down the country, as I correctly predicted. The Conservative’s assault on pensioners benefits saw them lose Eastbourne, the town whose residents have oldest average age in Britain. Straight-talking Tory MP Nigel Evans likened the inclusion of such unpopular measures as sailing an ocean liner straight into an iceberg.

A pledge to hold a free vote on bringing back fox hunting was another own goal as it galvanized the animal welfare lobby, already incensed by the government’s support for culling badgers and its binning of their pledge to ban ivory trading.

Added to the kamikaze manifesto, the Conservatives, and the political/media Establishment in general, totally underestimated Jeremy Corbyn and the cross-generational appeal of his populist left-wing policies at a time when millions of Britain have been reeling from the effects and falling real wages. It’s easy to scoff at plans to renationalize the railways as “going back to the 70s” if you’re a well-paid insider, but if you’re a commuter having to fork out a fortune for your season ticket and then being herded every day on to an overcrowded cattle-truck, it’s a vote winner.

It’s easy too to scoff at plans to scrap tuition fees if you benefited from a free university education yourself and were not saddled with a large debt when you got your degree. From protecting pensioner benefits to making the rich and the big corporations pay more tax to help save the cash-strapped NHS, opinion polls showed that Labour’s policies were popular and people were enthused by the fact that, for the first time in many years there was a genuine choice available to them in the election.Those inside the Bastille just didn’t pick up on how the public mood outside the gates had changed. They were too busy following and praising each other on Twitter and reinforcing each other’s anti-Corbyn prejudices to notice that people in 2017 wanted something more than reheated Blairism. They laughed at the huge crowds turning out to watch Corbyn speak up and down and the country and said it proved nothing.

On Thursday, in a splendid show of defiance, the public stuck two fingers up at the well-heeled “experts” and “political pundits,” and voted for a party led by a man we were told was unfit to even be an MP.

Make no mistake, GE17 shows us that the power of the gatekeepers is on the wane, if not finished altogether. No longer do people accept that certain individuals with an exaggerated sense of self-importance have the right to tell them what policies and politicians are “off limits” — and which views are “acceptable” and which are not.

Public ownership, a change in UK’s neocon foreign policy- and a break with neoliberalism were put before the voters — and they responded positively.

Thursday June 8, 2017 was not just a vindication of the politics of Jeremy Corbyn. It was also a great day for British democracy.

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Jeremy Corbyn: 1, British mainstream media: 0

https://www.rt.com/op-edge/391660-jeremy-corbyn-british-mainstream-media/

Bryan MacDonald
Bryan MacDonald is an Irish journalist, who is based in Russia
Jeremy Corbyn: 1, British mainstream media: 0
From it’s “The Sun Wot Won It” to a vacuum. The Labour Party’s surge this Thursday spells the end of the popular press’ ability to manipulate the outcome of elections. It also proves the relevance of alternative media in the internet age.

It was June, 2015. And RT UK’s Afshin Rattansi was interviewing a man in a beige blazer about his unlikely bid to lead British Labour. His name was Jeremy Corbyn, and he spoke a lot of sense. Too much of it to win the leadership contest, it immediately appeared.

Over the following weeks, Corbyn’s support increased, and the Labour-leaning mainstream media became more-and-more opposed to his candidacy. Particularly the Guardian, a newspaper which professes to be a leftist organ, but, in reality, will always favor liberal causes over those affecting the poor. With this in mind, they enthusiastically backed Andy Burnham, a Blairite, who lost to Corbyn in a landslide (19 percent to 59 percent).

At the same time, the Tory-supporting Daily Mail, Daily Telegraph, Times and The Sun welcomed the new Labour leader with glee. Because they assumed he’d make the Conservative’s hold on power even stronger. They spent the next two years ridiculing Corbyn, until just before Thursday’s poll when they realized he had a realistic chance of upsetting their favored Theresa May.

A new low

The Mail’s attack was something else.

An unprecedented thirteen-page smear assault which plowed the depths of thuggery, and exhibiting all the class and restraint of a drunk left alone overnight in a wine cellar.
Meanwhile, Rupert Murdoch’s Sun
also maligned and vilified the opposition leader with a variety of insults of which “Marxist extremist” was probably the most kind. And its sister paper, The Times, appeared to have a full-time Corbyn-basher, one Oliver Kamm, whose obsession with besmirching the politician built up to crescendo by polling day.

Of course, Kamm, and his fellow travelers were trying to protect their bosses’ beloved Theresa May and her sacred majority. But notionally leftist opponents of Corbyn are the ones looking like the biggest mugs today.

Here’s a selection of Guardian comment headlines from the past 24 months or so.

30 July 2015 – Michael White – “If Labour elects Jeremy Corbyn as leader, it will be the most reckless move since choosing the admirable but unworldly pacifist, George Lansbury, in 1932.”

25 June 2016 – Polly Toynbee – “Dismal, spineless, Jeremy Corbyn let us down again.”

28 June 2016 – Editorial – “The question is no longer whether his (Corbyn’s) leadership should end because at Westminster it already has. The challenge for the Labour left is to rescue something from it.”

14 December 2016 – Rafael Behr – “Jeremy Corbyn may be unassailable, but he is not leading Labour.”

11 January 2017 – Suzanne Moore – “Labour’s Corbyn reboot shows exactly why he has to go.”

1 March 2017 – Owen Jones – “Jeremy Corbyn says he is staying. That’s not good enough.”

5 May 2017 – Jonathan Freedland – “No more excuses: Jeremy Corbyn is to blame for this meltdown.” (almost a month before polling day).

Also, 5 May 2017 – Nick Cohen – “Corbyn & (John) McDonnell could limit a Tory landslide by resigning now. That they would rather die, shows the far left is an anti-Labour movement.” (ditto)

And let’s not forget The New Statesman, where Jason Cowley suggested, only on Tuesday, that Corbyn could be leading his party to “its worst defeat since 1935.” Two days before he delivered Labour’s biggest vote share increase since 1945.

And that was the election where Labour’s greatest ever chief, Clement Attlee, stunned a victorious Winston Churchill in the aftermath of World War Two. Or Cowley’s colleague, George Eaton, who told us in March: “Jeremy knows he can’t do the job…. senior figures from all parties discuss the way forward: a new Labour leader, a new party or something else?”

The new wave

Also, worth a mention in this social media era, are Twitter “freelancers” like the author JK Rowling. In September of last year, she described Corbyn as “Utterly deluded,” saying “I want a Labour govt (sic), to help people trapped where I was once trapped. Corbyn helps only Tories.”

The Labour leader has achieved something remarkable this week. Of course, he hasn’t won the election, but given the sheer scale of the propaganda he had to overcome, Labour’s performance was truly extraordinary.

The myopia of the establishment media is also something to behold.

Here’s BBC’s Andrew Marr: “No one expected Corbyn to be such a cracking campaigner.” But as Neil Clark correctly points out “yes we did. But you weren’t listening to us.”

And therein lies the rub. The mainstream press devotes endless broadcast hours and column inches to bombarding its readers and listeners with scare stories about alternative media outlets. Which, naturally, includes the very website you are reading right now.

If they called off the hounds and took some notice, they might realize why alternate video, radio and blog services have become so popular – because often they see plainly the reality that the establishment media simply refuses to.

And how the incredible bias and shortsightedness of traditional industry leaders is the primary reason. Corbyn has laid bare their vulnerabilities this week, and these self-appointed emperors have been exposed as scant of cloth. Thus, he’s achieved a result his beloved Arsenal used to revel in. It’s 1-0 to Jeremy Corbyn. And fair play to him.

The statements, views and opinions expressed in this column are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of RT.

UK Election 2017 Exit Poll: British PM May Poised to Lose Election Gamble
Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May speaks at a campaign event at Tech Pixies, a digital marketing company in Oxford, May 15, 2017.

UK Election 2017 Exit Poll: British PM May Poised to Lose Election Gamble

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https://sputniknews.com/europe/201706081054454261-uk-election-brexit/

British Prime Minister Theresa May is set to lose her majority in the UK lower parliament, according to the final exit poll. May called the snap election to deliver a mandate going into negotiations over Britain’s exit from the European Union, in a bid to give her an advantage in the discussions in Brussels.

Theresa May called the election knowing she had a lead in the opinion polls, despite having previously saying she would not. However, she took the political advantage of the opposition Labour Party’s fallout with its leader, Jeremy Corbyn, to gain what she described as a “mandate” to go to Brussels and fight for a “hard Brexit.”

The vote closed at 22:00 UK time, June 8, with exit polls showing she was due to win 314 seats, yet not secure enough to gain an overall  majority in the House of Commons, with opinion polls previously showing the gap between her and Corbyn’s Labour Party closing in recent weeks.

Labour are predicted to gain 266 seats, with other parties making up the rest — leaving Theresa May short of a majority.

​May announced she would trigger Article 50 of the Treaty of Lisbon — formally beginning the process of leaving the EU — by the end of March 2017.  She said during her first few months in office that she would not call a general election that would give her a personal mandate as prime minister, having taken over as Conservative Party leader from David Cameron.

However, she changed her mind and called an election, when she knew she would face no opposition from the Labour Party, the majority of whose MPs — largely opposed to its leader, Jeremy Corbyn — wanted an election precisely to lose it and depose Corbyn.

As the votes come in overnight, June 8/9, May is watching to see if the polls are right, otherwise she will not be able to go into the Brexit negotiations with Brussels confident that she has secured her mandate for a hard Brexit.

UK 2017 general election preliminary results

Official results
value, %
1
Labour (Lab)
Jeremy Corbyn
41,6
2
Conservatives (Con)
Theresa May
40,4
3
Liberal Democrats (LD)
Tim Farron
6,3
4
Scottish National Party (SNP)
Nicola Sturgeon
3,6
5
UK Independence Party (UKIP)
Paul Nuttall
2
6
Others
6,1

Seats won

145
Con
163
Lab
3
LD
23
SNP
0
UKIP
16
Others
326 seats required for a majority
Latest update 09.06.17 02:19 GMT
Theresa May, Theresa Might, Theresa Regrets: UK PM Looks to Lose Sure Bet
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Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May delivers a speech during an election campaign visit to Langton Rugby Club in Stoke-on-Trent, June 6, 2017.

Theresa May, Theresa Might, Theresa Regrets: UK PM Looks to Lose Sure Bet

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UK Prime Minister Theresa May is holed up with her Conservative Party colleagues anxiously awaiting the outcome of the UK election, after she threw her weight behind a snap bid for glory.

May hoped her stature as only the UK’s second female prime minister, after Margaret Thatcher, would give her an edge in the vote.

With exit polls showing she is due to lose her overall majority in the UK Parliament, May can only hope early predictions are wrong. Ahead of the results coming in June 9, she is staring in the face of defeat, having called an election she was sure she would win with a landslide victory.

She inherited the role of prime minister after her predecessor, David Cameron, made the wrong call over the UK referendum on staying in the European Union. With May perhaps following in his footsteps, the nation is waiting to see if she too erred in going to the public for a stronger mandate to take to Brussels in hopes of striking a better deal with the EU.

If the exit polls are right, she, too, has made the wrong call. Cameron took the decision to hold a referendum on Britain’s membership in the European Union, confident he could lead the debate, win backing from Brussels and keep the UK safely inside the EU.

He had negotiated a series of agreements with his EU partners, including the “emergency brake” deal to limit access to in-work benefits for new EU immigrants, confirmation that the UK would not seek “ever closer union” and the non-discrimination of countries not in the Eurozone.

He lost the referendum, and Britain voted to leave the EU. May, with only a working majority of 17 in the House of Commons, tried a similar trick to try to bolster her majority ahead of the difficult divorce her predecessor’s error had made inevitable.

When she called the election, May had a 24-point advantage in opinion polls and was seen as sure to secure a landslide victory. However, in the weeks that preceded the June 8 election, she lost her advantage.

She refused to take part in head-to-head debates on British TV with her opponents and was forced to make a humiliating U-turn on a manifesto pledge over elderly care, which managed to upset many within her own party.

Now she sits awaiting the result and wondering whether the call she made for the UK to back a “strong and stable” prime minister is looking as foolish as Cameron’s promise to deliver a result that would leave Britain better off in the EU.

UK 2017 general election preliminary results

Official results
value, %
1
Labour (Lab)
Jeremy Corbyn
41,9
2
Conservatives (Con)
Theresa May
40,2
3
Liberal Democrats (LD)
Tim Farron
6,4
4
Scottish National Party (SNP)
Nicola Sturgeon
3,5
5
UK Independence Party (UKIP)
Paul Nuttall
2
6
Others
6

Seats won

134
Con
151
Lab
3
LD
22
SNP
0
UKIP
14
Others
326 seats required for a majority
Latest update 09.06.17 02:12 GMT
Corbyn will give us the Brexit we want
| June 6, 2017 | 9:05 pm | Jeremy Corbyn, political struggle, UK | No comments

Corbyn will give us the Brexit we want


Jun
2017
Friday 2nd
posted by Morning Star in Editorial
https://www.morningstaronline.co.uk/a-394e-Corbyn-will-give-us-the-Brexit-we-want

THERESA MAY repeats ad nauseam that only she is strong and stable enough to negotiate Britain’s exit from the European Union, but who knows what her agenda is?

May derides Corbyn as not having a Brexit plan, but the totality of her vision for Britain after leaving the EU is to create “the world’s great meritocracy,” by which she understands an expansion of grammar schools in England.

“You can only deliver Brexit if you believe in Brexit,” she intoned in Teesside, perhaps forgetting that she campaigned for Britain to remain an EU member.

Indeed she told merchant bankers — her core audience — just weeks before the referendum vote: “If we were not in Europe, I think there would be firms and companies who would be looking to say, do they need to develop a mainland Europe presence rather than a UK presence? So I think there are definite benefits for us in economic terms.”

May followed the City line of remaining and her priority is still doing a deal to benefit transnational finance sector interests no matter the effect on the rest of the economy.

The Tory leader’s refusal to come clean on this reflects her reluctance to give details on other aspects of economic policy.

She jumped like a scalded cat when pensioners twigged that there was no upper limit on home care charges under her proposed dementia tax, insisting that there would be a cap but wouldn’t say what it would be.

Old people’s winter fuel payments will not be a universal benefit if she wins another term in Number 10, but she won’t reveal a qualifying cut-off income.

Chancellor Philip Hammond had to drop his idea of raising national insurance for self-employed workers because of Cameron’s manifesto pledge, so May has dropped the “no rise in income tax or national insurance” commitment but won’t confirm her plan to reinstate Hammond’s scheme.

While Labour has costed its entire economic programme, the Tories have made various declarations without the slightest effort to suggest where the cash may come from.

On both the economy and EU exit negotiations, May recites: “Trust me, I’m a Tory politician.”

Far from Corbyn not having a plan, he stresses that EU citizens working here would be entitled to remain here indefinitely, that all EU workplace and environmental conditions must be maintained and that a mutually beneficial trade deal should be negotiated to defend jobs and national income.

While the Labour leader followed his party’s position of remaining in the EU, he understood clearly that, once a decision was taken last June 23, it must be accepted and implemented by government.

Too many in the labour movement accepted the Establishment line that the Leave decision was cast irrevocably in the image of the Tory far-right and Ukip and heralded an extended era of economic disaster for working people.

Some berated those on the left who campaigned to leave the EU neoliberal straitjacket that has crucified the people of Greece, together with the bloc’s racist Fortress Europe policies that condemn countless thousands of refugees to drown in the Mediterranean.

Such defeatists should acknowledge their own political short-sightedness as the Tories and their Kipper allies are currently in chaos while the odds on a Corbyn-led Labour victory are narrowing daily.

The sharp contrast over how to negotiate Brexit between Corbyn’s progressive internationalism that puts workers’ interests first and May’s boardrooms-dictated waffle should strengthen Labour’s position still further.

Trounce the Tories and charge Corbyn’s team with negotiating a People’s Brexit.

Anonymous comment on the British elections

Corbyn’s politics make U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders look like a Republican. He is an avowed socialist, with an election campaign chief who only last year left the Communist Party of Great Britain. The 68-year-old wants to rip up the economic model that has run the U.K. since the days of Thatcher and Reaganomics, capturing the backlash against globalization that was all too evident in the Brexit vote.