Category: Fascist terrorism
Golden Dawn’s fascists have no place in Santorini!

Monday, October 30, 2017

Golden Dawn’s fascists have no place in Santorini!

https://communismgr.blogspot.com/2017/10/golden-dawns-fascists-have-no-place-in.html
Around 20 Golden Dawn’s fascists tried to attack
a foreign student during the “OXI Day” parade.
“The fascist-nazi ideology has no place in our island” underlines the Santorini Party Organisation of the KKE in a statement issued regarding the racist incident of 28th October. 
 
Last Saturday, a group of around 20 Neo-Nazi Golden Dawn party members and “sympathizers” violently disrupted the traditional student parade for the “OXI Day” holiday celebration, because the flag-bearer was a foreign student. 
 
Just before the parade was about to start, the fascists of Golden Dawn wearing black t-shirts with “Hellas Ultra” printed on them, started shouting and terrorizing both the students who were getting ready for their parade and their parents. The police attempted to negotiate with them, but the atmosphere was already explosive.
 
The Santorini Party Organisation of the KKE strongly denounces the provocative and unacceptable behaviour of the fascists and calls “all parents, students and workers of the island, independently of race and religion, to condemn the fascist-nazi ideology wherever it appears”
 
The incident in Santorini island was also condemned by the Press Office of the CC of the KKE which issued the following comment:
 
“The cowardly attack of the Golden Dawn’s members to prevent an 11-year old student to hold the Greek flag, as well as their statement that the Greeks didn’t fight fascism and nazism but “the italian army”, shows their real nazist face. They are political descendants of those who were defeated in 1940-45 by the Great Antifascist Victory of the People and will be defeated again by the organised people’s struggle”.
Xenophobic assault: Nazi-saluting German 31yo beats up 15yo Afghan boy
| October 24, 2017 | 10:01 pm | Fascist terrorism, Germany | No comments

https://www.rt.com/news/407597-german-kicks-afghan-nazi-salute/

Xenophobic assault: Nazi-saluting German 31yo beats up 15yo Afghan boy

Xenophobic assault: Nazi-saluting German 31yo beats up 15yo Afghan boy
A 31-year-old German man verbally abused and physically attacked a 15-year-old refugee from Afghanistan. He hit the teen in the head, kicked his head on the ground, and performed a Nazi salute in Vogtland, southwestern Saxony.

Police have classified the assault as a xenophobic attack. The incident happened on a train late Saturday, DPA reported. According to witnesses, the man, who boarded the train at a station in Vogtland, near the Czech border, started to verbally insult the Afghan teen and his two Syrian companions.

The assailant made xenophobic statements and performed a Hitler salute. Just before the train reached Jocketa, the suspect punched the Afghan refugee in the head, Die Freie Presse reported.

The teenagers got out of the train at a stop near Plauen, but the man followed them and continued to attack the Afghan boy, hitting him in the head several times with his fist before kicking his head against the ground, according to police.

The teenager was rushed to the hospital in an ambulance. Police did not give further details on the extent of the injuries. “We want to protect the victim,” Tom Bernhardt, a press secretary of the Saxon State Criminal Police Office, told the newspaper.

Police have classified the assault as a xenophobic attack. The man, who was recorded with 1.9 per mille of alcohol in his blood, is now being investigated for a crime with racist motive. “It is quite likely that a right-radical background is present,” Bernhardt said, adding that the “investigation just began.” The teen was released from the hospital on Monday.

A conductor might have prevented the attack on the Afghan refugee, but only the driver was on the train, and he did not notice anything in the control room, Die Freie Presse reported.

As AfD joins Bundestag, thousands protest racism in Berlin

http://p.dw.com/p/2mJrV

 

As AfD joins Bundestag, thousands protest racism in Berlin

Two days before the new Bundestag convenes, protesters called on the German government not to tolerate right-wing hatred. The message was clearly directed at the far-right Alternative for Germany party.

 Permalink http://p.dw.com/p/2mK4H

Thousands gather in Berlin to condemn racism

On Tuesday, a far-right party will enter Germany’s parliament for the first time in nearly six decades. In an attempt to set the tone before the Alternative for Germany party (AfD) takes its seats in the Bundestag, at least 10,000 demonstrators turned out in front of Berlin’s Brandenburg Gate on Sunday, holding signs reading “My Heart Beats for Diversity,” “No AfD” and — playing on calls to cap the numbers of refugees allowed into the country — “Upper Limits on Nazis.”

The official title of the event, “Against Racism and Hate in the Bundestag,” didn’t explicitly mention the far-right party, which took 12.6 percent of the vote in national elections on September 24. But initiator Ali Can made clear who the intended recipient of the demonstration’s message was when he addressed the crowd.

“I’ve read the constitution and am somewhat shocked at some of the things politicians, especially the AfD, come out with,” Can said. “Have they even read Article 3? It explicitly states that no one shall be discriminated against or treated favorably because of where he comes from.”

The AfD swept into the Bundestag on a platform focused on hostility to refugees, the assertion that Germany is being “Islamified”, and the idea that migrants are a threat to law and order.

Can called for greater mutual respect in society and for politicians to lead the way, arguing that tolerance is in everyone’s interest.

“Even AfD politicians can be the victims of prejudice,” Can told DW. “We’re coming out here against racism and hatred in general, no matter where it comes from and at whom it’s directed.”

Can knows of what he speaks. The 23-year-old himself was once a refugee.

‘Clear, rigorous opposition’

Can, whose Turkish-Kurdish family fled southeastern Turkey for Germany when he was only 2 years old, is somewhat unusual among multicultural activists. For one, he seeks dialogue with the people he opposes.

Last year, for example, Can set up a “hotline for concerned citizens” who claimed to be worried about the negative effects that they believed migrants had had on Germany. Presenting himself as a “migrant you can trust,” Can posted his phone number on the internet — an act of considerable courage during an age in which hate speech and trolling have become so common — and encouraged AfD voters and supporters of the anti-immigration PEGIDA movement to call him with their questions.

Can is an unapologetic idealist who knows how to mobilize people and attract publicity to his cause. Sunday’s demonstration was organized at a furious pace after the election and was supported by more than a dozen prominent activist groups.

The turnout won’t likely do anything to change the minds of the Bundestag’s AfD deputies. Those with more political experience than Can point out that more than noble sentiments will be needed to impose limits on the AfD’s legislators.

“If you look at the list of the parliamentarians who will be joining the Bundestag, there are unfortunately a whole series of them who’ve attracted attention in the past with right-wing extremist or racist statements,” Anton Hofreiter, the joint parliamentary leader of the Greens, told DW. “It’s important to combat them with clear, rigorous opposition.”

Demonstration against AfD in Bundestag The protesters are anxious as the far-right party prepares to enter the Bundestag

The anti-AfD majority

Political realism did not deter Hofreiter from joining the ranks of the demonstrators who marched from the Brandenburg Gate to the Victory Column and the Reichstag, and then back to the Brandenburg Gate for a concert featuring the Berlin hip-hop and reggae band Culcha Candela.

“What we want to do today is to send a signal,” singer Johnny Strange told DW. “Some 13 percent of voters chose the AfD in the election, but there’s a large majority (who didn’t), and I think they should be seen and heard.”

he crowd that showed up on Sunday was an example of the diversity of German society. Some of the protesters had immigration backgrounds; others came out of a sense of duty stemming from the country’s Nazi past.

“I was born in Korea, but I grew up in Germany and have lived here for 40 years,” one woman said. “I want to say: ‘This is my land.’ I think in a democracy you have to fight for that.”

“I think as a German you have a responsibility to ensure that parties like the AfD never again have the final say in German politics,” a man said.

When pressed on what concrete measures they wanted German politicians to take, many of the protesters were at something of a loss. But they were clear that they do not want the Bundestag to become a forum for racist and xenophobic sentiments. And that was reason enough to take to the streets on a fine late-autumn day to vent their unease with the AfD.

DW recommends

Anti-fascists protest new office of Greek far-right Golden Dawn (VIDEO)

https://www.rt.com/news/407398-greece-golden-dawn-office-protest/

Anti-fascists protest new office of Greek far-right Golden Dawn (VIDEO)

Anti-fascists protest new office of Greek far-right Golden Dawn (VIDEO)
Anti-fascist demonstrators gathered at the offices of the Greek far-right party Golden Dawn to protest the opening of its new premises in the port city of Piraeus.

Speaking at the demonstration Friday, Magda Fyssa, the mother of Pavlos Fyssas, a local 34-year-old anti-fascist rapper who died after being stabbed to death by a member of Golden Dawn in 2013, labelled the opening of the offices a “provocation.”

“We are here to close those offices, because they shouldn’t exist, especially in Piraeus. We take to the street and fight,” she said.

READ MORE: Petrol bombs & tear gas in Athens at anniversary of Antifa rapper’s murder (VIDEO)

Following the murder of Pavlos Fyssas, police arrested the party’s leader, Nikolaos Michaloliakos, as well as several of its sitting MPs on suspicion of forming a criminal organization. The trial, which began in 2015, is still ongoing.

Tens of thousands of migrants have arrived in Piraeus in recent years, sleeping in tents or just blankets in open air encampments with poor sanitation and little food. Migrants have also become the targets of violent attacks by groups linked to Golden Dawn.

Earlier this month, two Pakistani immigrants were assaulted by a gang of five men hurling racist abuse in the town of Aspropygos, near Piraeus, according to Greek newspaper Kathimerini. The Greek Communist Party later accused Golden Dawn of involvement in the attack.

READ MORE: Right-wing extremists accused of attack on Greek refugee camp with petrol bombs, boulders (PHOTOS)

In 2016, eyewitnesses reported seeing some 60 members of Golden Dawn hurling boulders and molotov cocktails during an attack on a makeshift migrant camp on the Greek island of Chios.

The attack came several days after members of the right-wing Golden Dawn party held a rally on the island, calling for the refuges to be deported. “Of course Golden Dawn supporters are suspected to have participated,” Manolis Vournous, the mayor of the town, told the Guardian at the time.

Golden Dawn finished third in the country’s national elections in 2015, earning 18 seats in the Hellenic Parliament.

Some members of the public have hit back against its increased popularity, however. In March, young men wielding sledgehammers attacked its headquarters in Athens, smashing glass and throwing red paint at the entrance of the building.

Who killed Pablo Neruda?

Saturday, October 21, 2017

Who killed Pablo Neruda?

https://communismgr.blogspot.com/2017/10/who-killed-pablo-neruda.html

On April 2013, the remains of Chile’s Nobel Prize-winning poet Pablo Neruda had been exhumed in a bid to determine the cause of his death after his assistant alleged he was murdered by Gen Augusto Pinochet’s military regime.
Pablo Neruda’s bones were interred in the garden of Isla Negra, his beloved beach house on Chile’s Pacific coast. He is buried next to his wife and muse, Matilde Urrutia.
Four years later,the investigation into Pablo Neruda’s probable cause of death, has found that Chile’s most famous poet did not die of prostate cancer. The panel of experts focused on identifying pathogenic bacteria that might have caused his death. Forensic experts told a news conference in the capital Santiago, they were certain Neruda had not been killed by the disease.
Dr Aurelio Luna said they were “100% convinced” that the death certificate “does not reflect the reality of the death”. The official version was that he died of cachexia, or weakness, and wasting of the body due to chronic illness — in this case cancer.
Luna added, “We still can’t exclude nor affirm the natural or violent cause of Pablo Neruda’s death.”
The Nobel Laureate died in 1973 at the age of 69, less than two weeks after a military coup led by Chile’s former dictator General Augusto Pinochet.
His former driver Manuel Araya maintains Neruda was poisoned by the secret service.The poet was suffering from prostate cancer, but it was not life-threatening – leading the experts to conclude a third party could have possibly been involved. They will now carry out tests on a toxin found in his remains.
In 2015, Chile’s government said it’s “highly probable that a third party” was responsible for his death. Neruda was a supporter and personal friend of Chile’s deposed socialist President, Salvador Allende. He was traumatized by the military takeover and the persecution and killing of his friends. The celebrated writer had planned to go into exile, where he would have been an influential voice against the dictatorship.
Source: Telesur.
US Role in 1960s Indonesia Anti-Communist Massacre Revealed
Indonesia elite troops parade in Bandung, June 1966. The red caps are paratroopers in red berets.

US Role in 1960s Indonesia Anti-Communist Massacre Revealed

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Thirty thousand pages of files have been released on US activities in Indonesia during the archipelago’s gory transition from a socialist dictatorship to a pro-West military dictatorship in the mid-60s. The documents confirm that Washington was aware of, and supported, the military takeover of the government and purge of communist opponents.

The anti-communist purges in 1965 and 1966 were horrific, described by the CIA as “one of the worst mass murders of the 20th century.” Between 400,000 and 1 million accused leftists were killed, with some estimates going as far as to place the figure at 3 million.

It has long been known that the US and allied governments supported the 1965 military takeover. The US embassy, as well as the CIA, have been accused of providing weapons, economic assistance, and training to Suharto’s forces as well as lists of names of 5,000 communists. The embassy asserted in 1990 that the list in question was compiled by a single official acting on his own direction, and scholars debated whether or not the US helped facilitate the mass killings.

One of the newly released cables came from the embassy’s first secretary, Mary Vance Trent, who told Washington about a “fantastic switch which has occurred over 10 short weeks” that saw an estimated 100,000 people slaughtered.

A particularly shocking 1966 cable from CIA officer Edward Masters discussed the “problem” of captured communist prisoners. “Many provinces appear to be successfully meeting this problem by executing their [communist] prisoners, or killing them before they are captured, a task in which Muslim youth groups are providing assistance,” Masters reportedly said.

The documents were compiled in 2001 by the US State Department and subsequently classified, only to be released today. “We frankly do not know whether the real figure is closer to 100,000 or 1,000,000,” read an April 1966 cable attached to the 2001 report.

US Senator Tom Udall (D-NM), who introduced a bill in 2015 calling for the declassification of all US documents related to the matter as well as Indonesia to create a truth and reconciliation committee on the massacre, praised the release of documents. “These documents will provide greater transparency about the United States’ support for the Indonesian government during the same period that these horrible crimes were committed,” Udall said in a statement.

“Today represents real progress. But in Indonesia, many of the individuals behind these murders continue to live with impunity, and the victims and their descendants continue to be marginalized and unrecognized. These injustices are holding back Indonesia from achieving reconciliation and realizing its democratic potential. Here in the United States, we must encourage the continued democratic progress of a vital ally, and we must confront our own role in these terrible acts. Only by acknowledging the truth about our own history will the United States be able to speak out forcibly and credibly to defend human rights in the future.”

Indonesia, which had been a loose colony of the Netherlands for centuries, declared their independence in August 1945 and created the modern state of Indonesia, with the socialist and anti-imperialist Sukarno as the new nation’s first president. Sukarno attempted to balance the military, political Islam and communism in a policy called “Nasakom” and was a founding member of the Non-Aligned Movement with other formerly colonized countries like Egypt and India.

But over time, Sukarno favored his communist allies more, especially those abroad in China and the Soviet Union. Poverty and hunger besieged the world’s third largest communist country, and Indonesia accrued huge debts to Beijing and Moscow. Sukarno also cracked down on Islamists and attempted to weaken the society’s military elements through measures like the creation of a communist-aligned peasant militia.

After a failed coup against Sukarno in September 1965 that the military blamed on the Indonesian communist party and Chinese actors, the nation quickly dissolved into a brief but extremely bloody purge. The military and Islamists allied to annihilate Sukarno’s regime, slaughtering the communist party’s leadership. The documents also suggested that the US embassy had credible evidence that the coup was not orchestrated by the communists — later analysis would question the Indonesian military’s claim, and the culprits and motivation behind the coup attempt remain under dispute.

The rebellion’s leader, Major General Suharto, seized control of the presidency and placed Sukarno under house arrest, where he died in 1970 of kidney failure. Suharto would remain the nation’s US-friendly military dictator until he was forced to resign in 1998.

The legacy of the massacre remains complicated in Indonesia. School textbooks briefly discuss a “patriotic campaign,” a national uprising where 80,000 communist oppressors were killed. A 2016 symposium meant to discuss the tragedy was met with severe backlash, and in September 2017 an anti-communist mob disrupted a meeting of activists to discuss the massacre.

Indonesia massacres: Declassified US files shed new light

Indonesia massacres: Declassified US files shed new light
Relatives visit the site that is believed to be the burial ground for victims of a 1965 massacreImage copyright EPA
Image caption Relatives visit a site believed to be the burial ground for victims

The US knew people were being “delivered for slaughter” during a political purge in Indonesia during the 1960s, declassified documents reveal.

At least 500,000 people were killed between 1965 and 1966, after the army and local Muslim militia went on a rampage following an attempted coup.

It was one of the worst massacres of the 20th Century, but, at the time, Washington remained silent.

But these newly released memos reveal they had detailed knowledge of events.

The documents show US staff describing them in telegrams as “slaughter” and at times “indiscriminate killings”, exposing an intimate knowledge of the Indonesian army’s operations to “completely clean up” the Communist Party and leftist groups.

It is thought as many as three million could have lost their lives within a year.

Young people stood outside an hotel in Indonesia with a military armoured vehicle on stand byImage copyright Getty Images
Image caption The events of 1965-66 have been taboo for over 50 years in Indonesia

The violence – which was a taboo topic in Indonesia for almost 50 years and remains extremely sensitive even today – was unleashed after communists were accused of killing six generals at the end of September 1965.

It was the peak of the Cold War, and the struggle for power between the Communists, the military and Islamist groups was in full swing.

‘Delivered for slaughter’

Five decades later, the contents of the US telegrams are chilling.

According to one from US embassy staff in East Java, dated 28 December 1965, “victims are taken out of populous areas before being killed and bodies are buried rather than thrown in river” as they had been previously.

The telegram says prisoners suspected of being communists are also “being delivered to civilians for slaughter”.

Another document compiled by the US embassy’s first secretary, dated 17 December 1965, was a detailed list of the communist leaders across the country and whether they had been arrested or killed.

But the documents also make for uncomfortable reading for Indonesia’s biggest and most powerful Muslim organisations.

Young people holding flags with Arabic inscriptionsImage copyright Getty Images
Image caption Muslim students in Jakarta demanding a ban of communist groups in 1965

A December 1965 cable from the US consulate in Medan in Sumatra said that Muhammadiyah preachers were telling people it was a religious obligation to “kill suspected communists”. They were the lowest order of infidel, “the shedding of whose blood is comparable to killing chicken”, the report said.

The US cable said this was being interpreted as a “wide licence for killing”.

Another telegram notes that people with no connection to the Communist Party were being killed by the youth arm of Nahdlatul Ulama because of “personal feuds”.

Breaking the silence

Brad Simpson, founder and director of the Indonesia and East Timor documentation project, pushed for the files’ release

“These documents show in great detail just how aware US officials were of how many people were being killed,” said Mr Simpson, noting “the US stance at the time was silence”.

Human Rights Watch researcher Andreas Harsono also says his extensive research has found no public comments from the US government at the time about the killings.

Mr Simpson said there was growing public interest in Indonesia to know the truth after years of state anti-communism propaganda.

Oscar-nominated film The Act of KillingImage copyright Kevin Winter
Image caption Oscar-nominated film The Act of Killing re-enacted the mass executions

“Indonesians can now read for themselves and learn about these important events in Indonesian history as part of a larger struggle for justice and accountability,” he said.

The 39 formerly classified documents come from a collection of files, daily records and memos from the US embassy in Jakarta during the period 1964-1968.

They have been released by the National Declassification Centre, a division of the US government’s National Archives and Records Administration. More documents, including CIA files, are set to be released later this year.

Revisiting the violence

Lieutenant General Agus Widjojo’s father was one of the Indonesian generals killed in the alleged communist coup.

When the BBC showed Gen Widjojo the documents released on Tuesday, he said: “I cannot say anything to justify or reject what is explained in these documents, but basically the tragedy of 1965 was a struggle for power between the Communist Party and the army.”

He denied knowledge of reports in the US memos about ethnic Chinese being killed in the violence and their businesses being burnt down.

“I have no knowledge that the violence went as far as that, the intensity of the violence and the atrocities I have no first-hand witness or information,” he said.

But he believes the country needs to go through a truth-telling process.

After 50 years, the Indonesian government is going to investigate one of the worst massacres of the 20th Century.

“We should bring all parties concerned together to share their experiences but there must be one condition – the victims, they have to be at peace, they have to move on and see in reflection the tragedy of 1965 from the point of view of Indonesia in 2017.”

He says Indonesian society, including his own institution, the military, is not ready to openly discuss the killings. Attempts at holding seminars to mark the anniversary of the killings last month were shut down by violent demonstrations from right-wing groups.

A 2012 Oscar-nominated documentary, The Act of Killing, is among a list of films about the killings banned in Indonesia.

“We are not looking for a situation to reopen the wounds, we are looking for a situation to heal the wounds and to move on,” he said., “We would like to focus on what went wrong as a society that we were able to conduct such violence and such killings in such large numbers in such a short time.”

Reporting by the BBC’s Rebecca Henschke in Jakarta.